A handful of social-service organizations in southern Indiana, including Bloomington's Indiana Recovery Alliance (IRA), are using harm reduction in response to the current drug epidemic to try to reshape the way people think about addiction, drugs, risk, and community health. | Photo by Natasha Komoda

The drug-addiction epidemic in southern Indiana has defeated almost every effort people have tried to address the problem. But writer Paulina Guerrero looks into how some groups, such as the Indiana Recovery Alliance, are finding that a new method, called harm reduction, often has better results than the decades-old war on drugs. Click here to read the full story.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, a culture and lifestyle magazine for Bloomington, Indiana, and beyond! We publish new content every couple of days, so check back often. Or subscribe (for free) and receive an email whenever a new story is posted. And we have no paywall, so check out as many stories as you like. We’d love to hear your feedback.

    September 28, 2016

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"Chaos I" by Jean Tinguely. | Photo by Adam Reynolds

The architecture of Columbus, Indiana, is widely hailed for its quality and innovation. Lesser known, though, are the peculiar artworks throughout the city. Writer Chris Sims and photographer Adam Reynolds explored the town to see what draws not just architectural scholars but also art lovers from across the nation. Click here to read the full story.

Miller Susens walks through the Indiana University campus carrying her cello. Susens is studying music education in the Jacobs School of Music and often finds herself having to defend her major. | Photo by Ben Meraz

Since high school, Miller Susens has known what her career would be: teaching music. But now, as a cellist and junior at IU’s Jacobs School of Music, the music-education major has to answer questions like “Is music even a job?” The “major shaming,” she says, has never silenced her desire to teach. Click here to read the full story.

It’s been widely reported that Donald Trump’s nomination as the GOP presidential candidate is due to his appeal as an authoritarian and to the economic anxiety of voters. Two Indiana University researchers argue that Trump won in Indiana for a different reason — one deeply rooted in Hoosier history. | Photo by Gage Skidmore, Creative Commons

Donald Trump’s nomination as the GOP presidential candidate, it’s been widely reported, is due to the economic anxiety of voters and to Trump’s appeal as an authoritarian. But Luke B. Wood, a research associate and policy analyst, and Matthew Fowler, a political science researcher (both at IU), argue that Trump won in Indiana for a different reason — one deeply rooted in Hoosier history. Click here to read the full story.

Image by TJ Jaeger

Friday Night Auction at Dinky’s Is Down-Home Hoosier Fun [video]

Nearly every week, people drive from miles away to Dinky’s Auction Center in Daviess County (about 60 miles southwest of Bloomington) to hunt for treasures, mingle with others, or just take it all in. Videographer TJ Jaeger recently visited Dinky’s on a late-summer evening to capture an Amish tradition — the Friday night auction. Click here to watch the video and read the full story.

The Motorcycle Cannonball Run, which is named after Hoosier Erwin "Cannon Ball" Baker, will be coming through Bloomington on September 13. Riders will attempt the cross-country trek on century-old motorcycles. | Photo courtesy of Lake Express

Motorcycle Cannonball Run to Make Pit Stop in B-town on Sept. 13

On September 13, motorcyclists from around the world will make an overnight pit stop in Bloomington during the cross-country race Motorcycle Cannonball Run. All of the 95 motorcycles will be at least 100 years old, in an event that writer Dason Anderson calls “a grueling test of grit and mettle for both rider and machine.” Click here to read the full story.

A prototype of LimestonePostMagazine.com is laid out on the whiteboard — in our first office, the 615 Collective. | Photo by Lynae Sowinski

One Year, 100 Stories — Thank You, Readers!

Editorial Director Lynae Sowinski reflects on the first 100 stories in our first year of publishing Limestone Post Magazine. We’re grateful for the gifted contributors we get to work with, the vast range of stories that our savvy readers enjoy, and the chance to cover all the important topics that make Bloomington and southern Indiana so vibrant — and so vital. The response to our magazine has been beyond our wildest expectations. Thanks to everyone involved with Limestone Post for a fantastic launch year! Click here to read the full story.

The Indiana University Arts and Humanities Council has created the First Thursdays Festival at Showalter Arts Plaza — a monthly event that will “celebrate and showcase” a range of arts. | Photo courtesy of IU Office of First Year Experience Programs

IU to Showcase Artists with Massive Monthly Festival

Recognizing the wealth of “artists and thinkers” on campus, the IU Arts and Humanities Council has created the First Thursdays Festival at Showalter Arts Plaza. The monthly event will “celebrate and showcase” a range of arts — musical, visual, performance, and other creative endeavors — free and open to the public. Click here to read the full story.

Award-winning journalists and IU professors Tom and Kelley French tell the riveting story of their daughter, Juniper — who was born prematurely, at just 23 weeks — in their new book, "Juniper: The Girl Who Was Born Too Soon." | Courtesy photo

‘Juniper’ a Gripping Story of Local Family and a Girl ‘Born Too Soon’

The new book Juniper: The Girl Who Was Born Too Soon, by award-winning journalists and IU professors Tom and Kelley French, tells the riveting story of their daughter, Juniper, who was born prematurely — at just 23 weeks. Writer and WFHB radio host Michael Glab writes about the family and their book in his first story for Limestone Post. Click here to read the full story.

The “Birthplace of American Commercial Wine Making,” Vevey is a small town that sits along the Ohio River in southern Indiana. Built on winemaking, Vevey's Swiss Wine Festival runs from August 25-28. Writer Michael Waterford recommends AJ's, pictured here, for breakfast and as a place to get to know the locals. | Photo by Michael Waterford

Destination Small Town: Vevay, a Small Town with Big Wine

Older than the state itself, Vevay, Indiana, was home of the first successful commercial winery in the United States. The town is also built for tourists — in the best possible way. Its 1,600 residents put on 16 festivals annually. Their flagship event, the Swiss Wine Festival, is August 25-28. Besides, how many towns have a song named after them? Click here to read the full story.

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  • Random Quote

    “And if you think yoga is boring, check out an ever-growing variety of ways to get into downward dog. …Hip Hop Yoga (great playlists), Brew-ga (yoga plus craft beer), Snowga (yes, out in the snow), and Rage Yoga (where profanity is encouraged, as evidenced by their tagline: ‘becoming zen as f***’) are all out there — so get up and find your niche!” —Jen Hockney Bratton in “New Exercise Routines Offer More Than Dumbbells and Marathons"
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