Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde is a scholar, an egungun (an ancestral priest in the Yoruba Orisa tradition), a healer, a poet, a teacher, and a birth and postpartum doula. | Courtesy photo

Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde has been given many names, each one representative of her own history, her family’s history, and her Yoruba cultural heritage. And, like her names, Abegunde’s work represents the personal and the historical. LP columnist Michael G. Glab talks with the poet and scholar about her work with healing and social justice. Click here to read the full story.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, a culture and lifestyle magazine for Bloomington, Indiana, and beyond! Our contributors have the voice, vision, and passion to engage you in the wide range of topics that make this such a fascinating place to live. We publish new content every couple of days, so check back often. We’d love to hear your feedback.

    November 23, 2017

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Health educator and certified Ayurvedic practitioner Kristin Londergan’s roasted root veggies and red lentil dal with cabbage, rice, and millet. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

LP columnist Ruthie Cohen stirs up Ayurveda-inspired recipes from health educator Kristin Londergan. A 5,000-year-old holistic physical and spiritual practice, Ayurveda is meant to bring balance into one’s life. Ruthie says the food is “a feast for the eyes, a boon for your gut, a balm for your spirit.” Click here to read the full story.

New-York-based Equity actor Remy Germinario as Alex in Cardinal Stage’s 2015 production of "Buyer and Cellar." Rachel Glago, marketing manager at Cardinal Stage Company, says Equity houses lead “to overall economic growth.” | Photo by Blueline, courtesy of Cardinal Stage Company

In its rich and diverse theater community, Bloomington has only one “Equity House.” What does that mean? And is “professionalizing theater” important to a town this size? As Cardinal Stage Company’s Rachel Glago explains in this guest column, yes, because among other benefits it leads to “to overall economic growth.” Click here to read the full story.

Image by Duane Busick

“Clap your hands, clap your hands!” And a lone figure stands, claps, and dances. Others rise to join him while Richie Havens sings “Freedom! Freedom!” onstage at Woodstock in 1969. In this Duane Busick video, meet Jesse Slokum, Bloomington’s “Busker 4 Freedom” and the man who got multitudes to dance at Woodstock. Click here to watch the video.

Where once there was a trailhead near Crooked Creek Road on the Tecumseh Trail, Matt Flaherty encountered logging equipment and a trail in ruin. | Courtesy photo

Resistance to the DNR’s Logging of Yellowwood

Several diverse groups have mobilized in recent months to oppose logging in Yellowwood State Forest. The resistance comes to a head this week, as forest advocates, including hundreds of scientists, are asking Gov. Eric Holcomb to call off the plan to cut down trees in Yellowwood’s backcountry and old-growth forest areas. Click here for the full story and how to get involved.

The preamble to the Constitution begins “We the People,” but in presidential elections, the founders gave more power to people in less-populous states. | Copyright: klikk / 123RF Stock Photo

Small-State Bias and the Electoral College

While this election day will be quiet in Monroe County, many people are still actively resisting the “new normal” and changing what they see as wrong in our country. In this article, IU Professor Emeritus James Allison shows why abolishing the Electoral College is the fair thing to do for a democracy. Click here to read the full story.

The Lake Monroe watershed — the land and creeks that drain into the lake — includes parts of five counties. Friends of Lake Monroe are safeguarding the lake — along with our drinking water and the plants, fish, and wildlife — from the effects of runoff and logging. | Photo by Lynae Sowinski

Logging, Runoff in 5 Counties Threaten Health of Lake Monroe

The Lake Monroe watershed — the land and creeks that drain into the lake — includes parts of five counties. Writer Susan M. Brackney looks at a group of “friends” who are safeguarding the lake — along with our drinking water and the plants, fish, and wildlife of Lake Monroe — from the effects of runoff and logging. Click here to read the full story.

Ghost stories have been a part of Hoosier lore ever since there have been storytellers. Here are nine of Indiana's scariest spots. | Copyright: andreiuc88 / 123RF Stock Photo

9 Hoosier Haunts to Rattle Your Halloween

Ghost stories have been a part of Hoosier lore ever since there have been storytellers. In his first article for LP, writer Grayson Pitts goes in search of spirits, ghosts, and mysterious legends at nine of Indiana’s scariest spots, including a mournful cemetery, a boisterous (but empty) banquet hall, and even “Indiana’s Stonehenge.” Click here to read the full story.

Since the 2016 election, few people concerned about climate change thought they could have meaningful discussions with climate-science deniers. But members of Citizen’s Climate Lobby (CCL) believe their efforts have even encouraged some congressional Republicans to consider a solution to the issue. | Photo by Lynae Sowinski

Guest Column: Changing Minds on Climate Change Is Possible

Since the 2016 election, few people concerned about climate change thought they could have meaningful discussions with climate-science deniers. But members of Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) believe their efforts have even encouraged some congressional Republicans to consider a solution to the issue. In this guest column, writer and CCL activist Erin Hollinden explains how. Click here to read the full story.

The Butcher at the Barn of Terror. | Photo by Adam Reynolds

Ghouls, Zombies, and Butchers at the Barn of Terror [photo gallery]

Hiding in the wooded hills just north of town, off the old state highway, is a barn whose inhabitants have one goal — to scare the daylights out of you. Intrepid photographer Adam Reynolds captured some of the horrific ghouls that visitors will encounter at the Barn of Terror. Click here, if you dare.

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  • Random Quote

    “According to the 1831 Supreme Court case, Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, Native American nations are defined as ‘domestic dependent nations’ .… Since then, the federal government has violated nearly every treaty with Native nations, by taking over land that was to remain with a particular nation, damming rivers, and blocking Native hunting and fishing rights.” — Laura Reagan in "Standing Rock Protestors: ‘Water Is Life’"
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