William Morris, the attorney, radio DJ, and aspiring Episcopal deacon, says the foundation of all his work is teaching. Even on his radio show, "The Soul Kitchen," he says, “I’m teaching people different kinds of music.” | Limestone Post

William Morris, the attorney, radio DJ, and aspiring Episcopal deacon, says the foundation of all his work is teaching. Even on his radio show, The Soul Kitchen, “I’m teaching people different kinds of music,” he says. Michael G. Glab writes about Morris’s rich and varied life in his column, Big Mike’s B-town. Click here to read the full story.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to providing a space for informative, inclusive, and in-depth stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. Our local contributors cover the topics and issues that make this such an interesting place to live. All of our content is free, so browse our archives as much as you like! We’d love to hear your feedback.

    February 24, 2018

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Kitchen sage Ruthie Cohen ponders the wonders, and challenges, of life through the tissue-thin lens of phyllo. Working with the delicate dough is much like life, she says. And using it for Moroccan-inspired confections, a revelation. | vicushka / 123RF Stock Photo

In this serving of Stirring the Pot, kitchen sage Ruthie Cohen ponders the wonders, and challenges, of life through the tissue-thin lens of phyllo. Working with the delicate dough is much like life, she says. And using it for Moroccan-inspired confections, a revelation. “Honor the dough,” Ruthie writes, “and you’re good to go.” Click here to read the full story.

Tenor Simon Kyung Lee and soprano and founder of ÒperaMaya Mary Grogan sing a duet during the ÒperaMaya summer music festival. | Courtesy photo

Mary Grogan, creator and director of ÓperaMaya, is introducing Bloomington to the Maya culture — and introducing opera to the Maya in Mexico. ÓperaMaya tours, festival-like, all over the Yucatan Peninsula, where few have experienced the art form. Writer Jennifer Pacenza talks to Grogan about what this means for Bloomington and the Maya. Click here to read the full story.

Columnist Troy Maynard recounts the emotional hardship of raising a child only to hand them the keys and watch them leave. “Being a parent means preparing your kids as best you can,” Maynard writes, “then ultimately trusting them to fly on their own.” | Limestone Post

In My Dad Voice, columnist Troy Maynard recounts college parties, hot rods, and the emotional hardship of raising a child only to hand them the keys and watch them leave. “Being a parent means preparing your kids as best you can,” Maynard writes, “then ultimately trusting them to fly on their own.” Click here for the full story.

Every spring and fall, Indiana is at the heart of the eastern sandhill crane migration. Witness it once and you’ll mark their return on your calendar every year, writes LP contributor Jared Posey. | Photo by Katie Posey

The Mesmerizing Sandhill Cranes, ‘Calling Us Home’

Every spring and fall, Indiana is at the heart of the eastern sandhill crane migration. Witness it once and you’ll mark their return on your calendar every year, writes LP contributor Jared Posey. “Flocks of sandhill cranes are a potent symbol of wildness,” he says, their loud, rolling chatter “calling us home.” Click here to read the full story.

Kim Morris Newson, center, dances with the IU African American Dance Company in their Potpourri of the Arts concert, November 11, 2017, at the IU Auditorium. She says dance is "communication without words." | Photo courtesy of African American Arts Institute.

Women Find ‘Freedom to Express’ Through Dance

“In a world where women’s voices are undervalued,” writes Allison Yates, “dance companies in Bloomington provide an invaluable opportunity for women to cultivate self-love, build friendships, and find the necessary space for stress relief.” And more. Yates looks at a few of these groups to see how women connect body and soul through dance — “communication without words.” Click here to read the full story.

Image by Seth Teeters

3 Soap Guys Outwit National Brands Online [video]

When starting their business, Bloomington’s Soapy Soap guys created the “volcano method” of making soap. Four years later, they realized that same method would allow people to create their own customized soap — a process not offered by any other soap maker, not even national brands. Seth Teeters interviewed the soap founders in this video.

The conference, festival, and symposium called Wounded Galaxies 1968 intersects with Bloomington’s orbit next month. The event looks at the tumultuous year 1968, which included the Chicago protests and riots during the Democratic National Convention. (Pictured here is an anit-war march prior to the convention in 1968.) Wounded Galaxies organizer Joan Hawkins says the event will be more than a museum piece: “We want to confront the whole concept of revolutionary aesthetics, and ask, ‘Where do we go from here?’” | Photo by David Wilson, Creative Commons

Big Mike’s B-town: Wounded Galaxies, Where 1968 Intersects with 2018

Wounded Galaxies 1968 — a conference, festival, and symposium including art exhibits, film screenings, and music performances — intersects with Bloomington’s orbit next month. LP columnist Michael G. Glab spoke to Joan Hawkins, a founder of the group that’s organizing the event. While Wounded Galaxies looks at the tumultuous year 1968, Hawkins says the event will be more than a museum piece: “We want to confront the whole concept of revolutionary aesthetics, and ask, ‘Where do we go from here?’” Click here to read the full story.

Bloomington PRIDE, the local organization that represents the LGBTQ+ community, is “focused more on helping people on the margins,” says Board Chair Janae Cummings. | Courtesy photo

PRIDE — and Its Film Fest — More Inclusive Than Ever

As the 16th annual PRIDE Film Festival runs this weekend, PRIDE, the local organization that represents the LGBTQ+ community, is “focused more on helping people on the margins,” says Board Chair Janae Cummings. “We don’t want to leave anyone behind.” Writer Erin Hollinden reports on PRIDE’s “recalibrated” vision — and about the Festival. Click here to read the full story.

Writer Jared Posey says there are many ways to get kids interested in gardening. One is to make it look less like an adult activity — by using a toy as the garden, for example. | Photo by Katie Posey

Winter Gardening: Turning Little Thumbs Green

Winter gardening isn’t just for people who want to get a jump on their tomato starts. In his first LP contribution, Jared Posey shows how it can be a great way to educate and engage younger people. It’s the journey, he writes, “not the size of our cucumbers” that provides them with the lifelong learning. Click here to read the full story.

Local art lovers are anticipating the opening in April of FAR Center for the Contemporary Arts at Fourth and Rogers. Pictura owners David, left, and Martha Moore are doing more with FAR than moving their photography gallery into a historic building — they’re on a mission to “create a different experience” by bringing different kinds of art together. | Photo by Chaz Mottinger

New FAR Center Joins Arts Community at 4th & Rogers

Local art lovers are anticipating the opening of FAR Center for Contemporary Arts, the new art venue opening in April at Fourth and Rogers. Pictura owners David and Martha Moore are doing more than moving their photography gallery into a historic building — they’re on a mission to bring different kinds of art together. Writer Claude Cookman gives us an in-depth look at the FAR project and its creators. Click here to read the full story.

“Baking is an art that people consume,” home baker Elizabeth Bauder says. “It’s a creative outlet. It’s a way to love people.” Pictured here are her parade-worthy cinnamon rolls. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

Stirring the Pot: ‘Baking Is an Art That People Consume’

In her latest column, Stirring the Pot, Ruthie Cohen savors the confection of cinnamon rolls from home baker Elizabeth Bauder. With patience and care, these warm, gooey treats are surprisingly easy to make. Baking is a creative outlet, Elizabeth says. “It’s a way to love people.” Click here to read the full story.

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  • Random Quote

    "Handwritten notes affect me. There’s a sense of time to it; that this person held me in their mind for this long. Every sentence could be measured in hours for what they mean to me, and for what they mean in value, time, labor, history, small victories, and pain. Holding a letter — language in that tricky, scared, guarded form — it feels as though it channels a deeply human connection." — Michelle Gottschlich in "Beyond Reading, Adult Literacy Is Survival"
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