A local low-barrier housing program, called Courage to Change, helps people with substance use disorder find housing in Bloomington. | Limestone Post

Last year, a local housing program for people with substance use disorder was created by Marilyn Burrus and Brandon Drake. Writer Ann Georgescu talks with Drake about the program, Courage to Change, and helping people all along the spectrum of recovery. “It is our job to stop the chaos,” Drake says. Click here to read the full story.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, a culture and lifestyle magazine for Bloomington, Indiana, and beyond! Our contributors have the voice, vision, and passion to engage you in the wide range of topics that make this such a fascinating place to live. We publish new content every couple of days, so check back often. We’d love to hear your feedback.

    September 25, 2017

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Rise to Run is a new grassroots movement whose goal is to mobilize young progressive women to run for office. The Bloomington hub of the organization hosted its kickoff event in the Council Chambers of Bloomington's City Hall on September 17. | Limestone Post

Bloomington is one of four cities in the U.S. to launch Rise to Run, a new grassroots movement that encourages and trains high school- and college-aged women to run for office. Writer Allison Yates talks to local co-coordinators Regina Moore and Rachel Guglielmo about their program. Click here to read the full story.

A tricolored bat is one of ten species of bats found in Indiana. Southern Indiana has some of the country’s largest roosting places for Indiana bats. But these Hoosier mammals face many threats to their survival. | Illustration by April McKay

Southern Indiana has some of the country’s largest roosting places for Indiana bats. But these Hoosier mammals face many threats. Writer and bat fan April McKay gives us an in-depth look at these wondrous creatures, and how to help secure their survival — such as attending the Indiana Bat Festival. Click here to read the full story.

Friends Emily Bedwell, left, and Sarah Ruggles play Florence and Olive in the Monroe County Civic Theater production of "The Odd Couple (Female Version)" this weekend at The Waldron. | Limestone Post

Longtime friends Sarah Mae Ruggles and Emily Bedwell have acted in the Monroe County Civic Theater for years, and now they play opposites in Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple (Female Version). Jen Pacenza looks Behind the Curtain at Olive and Florence in this hilarious performance playing at The Waldron this weekend. Click here to read the full story.

Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and Bloomington expat Joel Pett returned to his hometown recently for a gallery show — and a stand-up gig at Thomas Gallery. | Photo by Devta Kidd

Joel Pett: Humanist with a ‘Mean Streak a Mile Wide’ Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Joel Pett served up an adult portion of art and stand-up at his homecoming

Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and Bloomington expat Joel Pett returned to his hometown recently for a gallery show — and a stand-up gig. After talking to Pett about his work, writer Yaël Ksander wonders whether a man with “a mean streak a mile wide” has, deep down, a passion for humanity. Click here to read the full story.

Leah Rose Hagen likes to use spices that appeal to her clients from their own cupboards in her Zoocanoe recipe. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

Stirring the Pot: Doula Do-Gooder, Leah Rose Hagen

If life hands you zucchinis, make zoocanoes! Leah Rose Hagen has followed her calling to share healthful food with others and to help mothers with newborns. The postpartum doula and founder of Nourish, an in-home chef and catering company, spoke to LP’s resident sage, Ruthie Cohen, about her life’s calling. Click here to read the full story.

Writer Ross Lockridge Jr. (RLJ) killed himself on March 6, 1948, just two months after his book "Raintree County" was published. Pictured here, RLJ is signing autographs at an L. S. Ayres department store in Indianapolis on January 20, 1948. This is the last known photograph of RLJ. | Photo by Robert Lavelle, "The Indianapolis News." Photographs from raintreecounty.com are used with permission of The Estate of Ross Lockridge, Jr.

Ross Lockridge Jr., a Great American Tragedy

In 1948, Ross Lockridge Jr. died by suicide in Bloomington just months after his best-selling novel, Raintree County, was published. In 2014, Doug Storm interviewed two of Lockridge’s sons for Interchange, his show on WFHB. Here, Storm writes about the sons’ conflicting opinions on the suicide and the assessment of Raintree County as the Great American Novel. Click here to read the full story.

Meklit, an Ethiopian-born, Oakland-raised, Ethio-jazz musician and philanthropist. | Courtesy photo

World Music Trailblazers Bring Innovative Sounds to Lotus

Music speaks. And it can tell stories. Musical acts Meklit (Ethiopia) and Sabha Motallebi (Iran) will showcase their own forms of musical storytelling this year at the Lotus World Music and Arts Festival. In part 3 of his series, writer Benjamin Beane explores their genre-bending and -expanding music — and the stories they want to tell. Click here to read the full story.

Indiana University Research Scientist Adam Fudickar studies animal behavior in response to climate change. “Many parts of the planet that haven’t changed for a really long time are changing very rapidly,” he says. While many species cannot adapt fast enough, some — such as the dark-eyed junco — can, which provides hope to researchers. | Photo courtesy of ziggy777 / 123RF Stock Photo

IU Researcher: Some Species Adapt Faster to Climate Change

IU Research Scientist Adam Fudickar studies animal behavior in response to climate change. “Many parts of the planet that haven’t changed for a really long time are changing very rapidly,” he says. While many species cannot adapt fast enough, some can, which provides hope to researchers. Writer Brian Hartz explores Fudickar’s work on the dark-eyed junco. Click here to read the full story.

For Kate Hess Pace, founder of the progressive grassroots group Hoosier Action, voting matters, but there are also “many, many other ways for people to build power for change.” Pictured here, members of Hoosier Action gather outside of Senator Joe Donnelly's office before meeting with his state director to discuss health care. | Courtesy photo

Big Mike’s B-town: Kate Hess Pace, Building Power for Change

For Kate Hess Pace, founder of the progressive grassroots group Hoosier Action, voting matters, but there are also “many, many other ways for people to build power for change.” She spoke about empowering people with Michael G. Glab on his WFHB show Big Talk, and here, in Glab’s LP column Big Mike’s B-town. Click here to read the full story.

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  • Random Quote

    “During our wild-ginseng harvest season — recognized annually from September 1 to December 31 — ginseng diggers coax twisted roots out of the loam to sell to certified dealers who, in turn, may sell this ginseng legally from September 1 through March 31 of the following year.” — Susan M. Brackney in "Diggers, Dealers, and Appalachian Outlaws: Unearthing Indiana’s Ginseng Trade"
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