Image by TJ Jaeger

Grammy-nominated oud player Rahim AlHaj, an Iraqi political refugee since 1991, was invited by the Lotus Education and Arts Foundation to participate in the Lotus Blossoms outreach program in March. He performed at various Bloomington locations and also at Owen Valley High School in Spencer. Filmmaker TJ Jaeger recorded the trip.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, a culture and lifestyle magazine for Bloomington, Indiana, and beyond! Our contributors have the voice, vision, and passion to engage you in the wide range of topics that make this such a fascinating place to live. We publish new content every couple of days, so check back often. We’d love to hear your feedback.

    April 28, 2017

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The cast of Art of Africa's production of "My Children! My Africa!" by Athol Fugard: (l-r) Yusef Agunbiade as Thami, Ansley Valentine as Mr. M., and Tara Chiusano as Isabel. | Courtesy photo

New York Newsday describes Athol Fugard’s play My Children! My Africa! as “One of the theatre’s most affecting dissections of social upheaval.” Art of Africa, a new Bloomington theater company, brings the powerful play, directed by Murray McGibbon, to the John Waldron Arts Center. Jen Pacenza gives her preview in Behind the Curtain. Click here to read the full story.

Students at Templeton Elementary School participated in Templeton Eats Global by trying foods from all over the world and moving from station to station with passports to mark their "travels." | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

Carissa Marks is passionate about food justice. Growing up food insecure in Pennsylvania, she now works with IU Biology Outreach to advocate for sustainable and healthful food systems. One of her projects was an international food festival at Templeton Elementary School. Stirring the Post columnist Ruthie Cohen attended — and learned that “food is language.” Click here to read the full story.

Ever since a team from a Black fraternity raced in the inaugural Little 500 in 1951, the race has had few minority participants. A concerted effort in the 2000s seemed to have broken the color barrier, with Team Major Taylor finishing as high as second place, but today the men’s and women’s races are nearly as white as ever. Pictured here is Team Major Taylor cyclist Simeon Commissiong prior to the start of the 2004 race. | Courtesy photo

Ever since a team from a Black fraternity raced in the inaugural Little 500 in 1951, the race has had few minority participants. A concerted effort in the 2000s seemed to have broken the color barrier, but today the men’s and women’s races are nearly as white as ever. Sarah Gordon takes an in-depth look at race in the most important race on campus. Click here to read the full story.

Journalist Doug Wissing has become something of a hands-on scholar of the U.S. war in Afghanistan. After embedding with several military units and speaking with the people of Afghanistan, Wissing says he was able to see “every aspect of the war.” | Photo courtesy of US Army, Major Denton Smith

Big Mike’s B-town: Doug Wissing, Embedded Journalist

Journalist Doug Wissing has become something of a hands-on scholar of the U.S. war in Afghanistan. After embedding with several military units, Wissing says he was able to see “every aspect of the war.” He shared his observations on the U.S. conflict in the war-torn country with Michael G. Glab. Read all about it in Glab’s column, Big Mike’s B-town.

Forrest Gilmore, executive director of Shalom Community Center, says anti-panhandling signs, an online petition, verbal and physical harassment, and countless other tactics are often fueled by the fear of becoming homeless and the desire to sweep the problem under the rug. | Limestone Post

Paths of Homelessness, Part 2: Demonizing the Less Fortunate

In part 2 of “Paths of Homelessness,” TJ Jaeger looks at the stigma dumped on the less fortunate people who experience homelessness. While they sometimes commit “nuisance crimes,” they don’t deserve being verbally and physically harassed, demonized, and treated as second-class humans, say the people who devote their time to helping. Click here to read the full story.

Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis. Indiana University political scientist Luke Wood looks at a potential clash between a more moderate Indiana Republican party and the Trump administration, on both economic and social concerns. | Photo by Derek Jensen

How Will Indiana Republican Politicians React to a Trump Administration?

Much has been written on the impact of a Donald Trump presidency on national politics. But what about in Indiana? Is the balance of power tilting within conservative circles? IU political scientist Luke Wood looks at a potential clash between a moderate Indiana Republican party and the Trump administration, on both economic and social concerns. Click here to read the full story.

Adventurer Michael Waterford is taking his second source-to-sea trip of the Mississippi River more seriously. Waterford is seen here at the Columbia River in Oregon, training for the second attempt. | Courtesy photo

From Source to Sea on the Mississippi — in a Canoe

In 2013, adventurer Michael Waterford tried canoeing the entire length of the Mississippi River. “It didn’t go well,” he says. But he got hooked on paddling, and in June he’s attempting to solo kayak the Mississippi in record-setting time. Follow his progress on Limestone Post, and read about his earlier, ill-fated trip here.

Photo by Richard Koenig

Tracks Through Time: The Trains of 1970s Bloomington

In the 1970s, a budding photographer in Bloomington captured images of trains as they passed through the area. Today, Richard Koenig, a professor of art at Kalamazoo College, shares his photographs with Limestone Post, showing how a once essential industry was threaded into the very fabric of town life. Click here to read the full story and to see Koenig’s photos.

Some of our favorite restaurants might never have happened without world-renowned chef, author, and food activist Alice Waters, who will visit Bloomington in April to inaugurate the IU Food Project. | Photo courtesy of Pexels, surajith s

Food Icon Alice Waters to Help Launch IU Food Project

Some of our favorite restaurants might never have happened without world-renowned chef, author, and food activist Alice Waters. Writer Benjamin Beane spoke to Waters about her visit to Bloomington on April 6-8 to officially launch the IU Food Project, which was created to address the challenges of providing sustainable food for a changing planet. Click here to read the full story.

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  • Random Quote

    “It’s hard to explain the grandeur and enormous power of a river. Facts about flow, width, and depth don’t do it justice. But feeling a 30-mile-per-hour headwind while sitting in a 12-foot chunk of gnarled plastic three miles from shore is one way to get a sense of it.” —Michael Waterford in “From Source to Sea on the Mississippi — in a Canoe”
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