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Ruthie Cohen

Ruthie Cohen

Ruthie Cohen moved from New Jersey to Bloomington in November 2011. Every day she marvels at her good fortune to be living in this gem of a town. When she isn’t concocting recipes in her kitchen, you can find her teaching and practicing at Ekah Yoga and VibeYoga and Pilates studios; wielding a hammer or a paintbrush with the mid-week crew folks at Habitat for Humanity; or hanging out with future chess masters at the Crestmont Boys' and Girls' club.

Posts by this contributor 17 results

Stirring the Pot: Food Is a Language That Teaches Diversity

Carissa Marks is passionate about food justice. Growing up food insecure in Pennsylvania, she now works with IU Biology Outreach to advocate for sustainable and healthful food systems. One of her projects was an international food festival at Templeton Elementary School. Stirring the Post columnist Ruthie Cohen attended — and learned that “food is language.” Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Guiltless and Often Tastier Shortcuts

Sometimes, taking a shortcut will reveal something new and wonderful; sometimes it just gets the job done faster. In the kitchen, as Ruthie Cohen has discovered several times, something as simple as a jar of salsa could be your eureka moment. Click here to read the full story.

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‘Dear S—’: A Letter from Women’s Marcher to 11-Year-Old Girl

On Saturday, January 21, Ruthie Cohen and two busloads of people arrived in Washington, D.C., after an all-night trip from Bloomington, to participate in the Women’s March on Washington. Afterward, in Bloomington, Ruthie penned a response to a friend’s 11-year old daughter, “S—,” who is skeptical about the march making any difference in the world. Here is her letter.

Stirring the Pot: Jewish Soul Food ‘Tastes Like Home’

Stirring the Pot columnist Ruthie Cohen and Limestone Post invite you to share the foods and stories that make your family recipes “taste like home.” We start with kugel — and Ruthie’s memory of how she grew to appreciate the taste and texture of “Jewish soul food” — and how now, she says, they “taste like home.” Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: At Thanksgiving, Let ‘the Absurdities’ Creep In

Ruthie Cohen shares her wisdom about what’s most important at Thanksgiving dinner. People often get distracted by the bird, the side dishes, or the presentation. In this edition of Stirring the Pot, she advises not to suppress “the absurdities and silliness that creep in” — and enjoy not knowing how it will all turn out. Click here to read the full story.

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Stirring the Pot: Ode to an Auntie — The Blintz and the Brat

In this edition of Stirring the Pot, Ruthie Cohen recalls her childhood when great-aunt Lilly, “a contemporary of George Washington,” would visit from Florida. Although Aunt Lilly spoke in fractured English with a Yiddish accent, when she stepped in the kitchen she spoke through her cooking — eloquently and with love. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Playing Favorites

Before every visit from her children, Ruthie Cohen receives “The Rider,” which contains all the dishes they want her to prepare during their stay. She joyfully complies with their requests — sometimes including a new dish or two — with dessert as the meal's finale. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Consider the Zucchini

Ruthie Cohen tells us to look at the familiar, the routine, the same old road, with a sense of wonder. “The surprise of rediscovery can be sweet and surprising,” she says. Consider the zucchini. Usually overlooked as a secondary ingredient or a side dish, this commonplace veggie has the makings of a star. Click here to read the full story.

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Stirring the Pot: Spring — Such Bounty, Such Joy

Spring brings such a fresh bounty of veggies and greens, the recipes are bound only by your mood and temperament, says Ruthie Cohen. “In food, in fashion, in life, we are always making choices, assembling, reassembling, collecting, discarding.” Making the everyday unique, making the timeless your own, she says, creates loveliness in the world. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Granola, Where More Is Often Less — How Lifelike

Ruthie Cohen has learned that you don’t mess with certain things in life. Her chicken soup, for instance. Or her mother’s meatball recipe. But, usually, as with Ruthie's granola, the recipe changes: Ingredients are added and deleted until, ultimately, the dish is stripped to its delicious essence. How lifelike. Click here to read the full story.