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IU Mandela Washington Fellow Takes ‘New Ideas’ from Indiana Home to Sierra Leone

Eastina Marian Boimadi Taylor was so inspired by her visit to Indiana this past summer that she is using some of the ideas created here to inspire others in her home in Freetown, Sierra Leone. She says, "All I see now is possibilities." This is the second of two Q&A articles featuring young leaders in the Mandela Washington Fellowship at Indiana University. Click here to read the full story.

My Dad Voice: Sock It To Me

“Helplessly watching your child experience pain changes you at a basic level,” writes Troy Maynard in his column, My Dad Voice. But overprotective parenting, he says, makes children less prepared for the real world. How does a parent endure watching their child suffer? A pair of pink socks has pulled Maynard through. Heavy sigh. Click here to read the full story.

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What Do Babies Know? IU Scientists Say ‘More Than You Think’

Researchers of infant development at IU say we — and artificial intelligence — can learn a lot from babies. And some have teamed up with the staff at WonderLab to create exhibits and activities tailor-made for young patrons, writes Jennifer Richler. While genes explain some of the differences in the rate at which kids develop, the environment does too — and that’s where places like WonderLab can help. Click here to read the full story.

Tuskegee Airmen at 1940s Hoosier Airfield Played Role in Military Desegregation

In 1948, President Truman signed an executive order that desegregated the U.S. military. While protests against segregation had occurred for years across the country, a nonviolent act of disobedience by 100 African American officers at an Army base in Seymour, Indiana, reportedly contributed to Truman’s decision. This protest, writer Paul Bean says, is often mischaracterized as an "uprising" or "mutiny." Click here to read the full story.

Edwin Fulwider’s Early-1900s Boyhood in Bloomington, ‘A Memoir’

More than thirty years ago, artist Edwin Fulwider wrote a memoir about growing up in Bloomington in the early 1900s. The memoir portrays a “rich landscape of local art, life, and history” of a bygone era, writes Michelle Gottschlich. Fulwider’s perspective is especially insightful because he grew up in several different neighborhoods. Click here to read the full story.

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Can Bloomington Be Called the ‘Biking Capital of the Midwest’?

While the city’s biking infrastructure leaves much to be desired, Bloomington has plenty to back its claim as the Biking Capital of the Midwest, argues writer and avid biker Sean Starowitz. Whether it’s gravel, road, trail, or mountain biking, Bloomington is the hub of some of the best riding around. Click here for more, including Starowitz's suggestions for routes, clubs, and more.

Guest Column: Lotus Artists Follow Hearts, Challenge Social Injustices

With all the world music being performed this week at Lotus, at least two acts have powerful messages for our own country. Raye Zaragoza’s music often conveys political, social, or environmental messages folded into song, while Making Movies portrays the struggles of immigrants, writes Sara Sheikh, marketing director of the Lotus Education & Arts Foundation. Click here to read the full story.

IU Mandela Washington Fellow Shares Impressions and Photos of Bloomington

Francis Shok Mweze spent six weeks this summer in IU’s Mandela Washington Fellowship. Now back in Bukavu, Democratic Republic of the Congo, he hopes to make his hometown a “visual arts capital in the region.” Limestone Post asked Mweze about his ambitions, his stay in Bloomington, and about the photos he took while here. Click here to read our Q&A with Mweze and to see some of his photos of Bloomington.

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Organizing the Left Through Strategy and Solidarity

How do people with similar values unite when their methods of action conflict with each other? Writer and organizer Alexandria Hollett says this question is illuminated by “the difference between organizing campaigns on the one hand and symbolic activism on the other.” Hollett speaks to several local activists about “building the world we all deserve.” Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Cristian Medina, Scientist, Poet, Chess Leader

Cristian Medina, a poet, cook, IU researcher, and chess leader from Arica, Chile, has found plenty to keep him busy since moving to Bloomington in the mid-2000s. LP columnist Michael G. Glab talks to Medina about his hometown — bordered by ocean, mountains, and desert — geology and climate change, his work founding Cardboard House Press, and more in the latest Big-Mike’s B-town. Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: New Film on ‘Life and Slimes’ of Gameshow Host Marc Summers

Marc Summers, host of the gameshow Double Dare, is back in town for the screening of the documentary On Your Marc at IU Cinema. Writer Jennifer Pacenza talked to Summers and BPP’s Chad Rabinovitz about “Summers’s deeply personal story” and the 2016 BPP play, Everything In Its Place, during which much of the documentary was filmed. Click here to read the full story.

Hoosier Heritage on Display at 2 Massive Festivals This Month

If you’re looking to escape the weekend crowds this month, two massive festivals in two tiny towns might just be the ticket. Writer Patti Danner guides us through what you can expect from the White River Valley Antique Show (Sept. 6-9) and the Lanesville Heritage Weekend (Sept. 13-16). Each are chockfull of authentic Hoosier heritage and late-summer fun. Click here to read the full story.