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Ghouls, Zombies, and Butchers at the Barn of Terror [photo gallery]

Hiding in the wooded hills just north of town, off the old state highway, is a barn whose inhabitants have one goal — to scare the daylights out of you. Intrepid photographer Adam Reynolds captured some of the horrific ghouls that visitors will encounter at the Barn of Terror. Click here, if you dare.

Sexy or Racist? Halloween Costumes That Promote Stereotypes

When is a Halloween costume racist? Unless you’re going as a pumpkin, a zombie, or a couple’s salt and pepper shakers, you might consider the offensive message your costume is sending. Writer Laura Reagan shows why a “sexy Indian princess” costume, for example, perpetuates stereotypes and ignores the history of abuse suffered by Native Americans. Click here to read the full story.

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Remembering To Be an Artist When Life Gets in the Way

Finding work-life balance isn’t what people normally associate with the Picassos and Pollocks of the art world. Yet it’s a real-life dilemma for many working artists. Writer Yaël Ksander talks with several artists about how domestic life makes it “hard to remember that you are an artist. Especially if you’re a woman.” Click here to read the full story.

In Memoir ‘Crazy Is Relative,’ Past Informs the Present

In her memoir, Crazy Is Relative, IU Professor Melissa Keller writes about her relationship with her “fascinating and hilarious” mother-in-law, Shirley. As Keller learned about Shirley’s childhood, she began to see how the past informs the present. Writer Allison Yates talks with Keller about how histories define normal and, thus, “crazy is relative.” Click here to read the full story.

The Cycle of Life in Osamu James Nakagawa’s Photography

Throughout his career, Indiana University artist-educator Osamu James Nakagawa has captured profound life changes in his photography. As an exhibition of Nakagawa’s work opens October 13 at IU’s Grunwald Gallery, IU Professor Emeritus Claude Cookman observes how Nakagawa’s striking imagery reflects “death and life, grief and joy, past and future.” Click here to read the full story.

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Daisy Mae, PALS Tiny Animal Ambassador

She provides therapy for nearly 200 children and adults. And she’s only seven hands tall. Daisy Mae is a therapy horse at People & Animal Learning Services. Writer Sierra Vandervort talks to the PALS crew about the miniature horse affected by equine dwarfism, and the comfort she brings to people in Monroe County. Click here to read the full story.

‘Places, Things, People’ 4×5 Photo Gallery: Part 3, People

In the final installment of his photo series using a 4x5 field camera, Adam Reynolds reveals the collaboration between subject and photographer in portraiture. With a field camera, they have time to talk while the photographer sets up the shot. This ease allows the photographer to wait until the subject reveals their authentic self. Click here to see the photo gallery.

Lotus Time! Part 4, Young Musicians Fill the Bill

The Lotus World Music and Arts Festival is upon us, when performers from around the world fill the downtown streets with music. In part 4 of our series, writer Benjamin Beane profiles a young singer-songwriter from Scotland and an even younger brother/sister Indian-American duo who are rising stars in bluegrass. Click here to read the full story.

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Courage to Change Houses People with Substance Use Disorder

Last year, a local housing program for people with substance use disorder was created by Marilyn Burrus and Brandon Drake. Writer Ann Georgescu talks with Drake about the program, Courage to Change, and helping people all along the spectrum of recovery. “It is our job to stop the chaos,” Drake says. Click here to read the full story.

Rise to Run Trains Young Women to Enter Politics

Bloomington is one of four cities in the U.S. to launch Rise to Run, a new grassroots movement that encourages and trains high school- and college-aged women to run for office. Writer Allison Yates talks to local co-coordinators Regina Moore and Rachel Guglielmo about their program. Click here to read the full story.