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Arts 57 results

Rahim AlHaj: Lotus Blossoms Visiting Artist [video]

Grammy-nominated oud player Rahim AlHaj, an Iraqi political refugee since 1991, was invited by the Lotus Education and Arts Foundation to participate in the Lotus Blossoms outreach program in March. He performed at various Bloomington locations and also at Owen Valley High School in Spencer. Filmmaker TJ Jaeger recorded the trip.

Behind the Curtain: ‘My Children! My Africa!’

New York Newsday describes Athol Fugard’s play My Children! My Africa! as “One of the theatre’s most affecting dissections of social upheaval.” Art of Africa, a new Bloomington theater company, brings the powerful play, directed by Murray McGibbon, to the John Waldron Arts Center. Jen Pacenza gives her preview in Behind the Curtain. Click here to read the full story.

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Big Mike’s B-town: Doug Wissing, Embedded Journalist

Journalist Doug Wissing has become something of a hands-on scholar of the U.S. war in Afghanistan. After embedding with several military units, Wissing says he was able to see “every aspect of the war.” He shared his observations on the U.S. conflict in the war-torn country with Michael G. Glab. Read all about it in Glab’s column, Big Mike’s B-town.

Tracks Through Time: The Trains of 1970s Bloomington

In the 1970s, a budding photographer in Bloomington captured images of trains as they passed through the area. Today, Richard Koenig, a professor of art at Kalamazoo College, shares his photographs with Limestone Post, showing how a once essential industry was threaded into the very fabric of town life. Click here to read the full story and to see Koenig's photos.

Behind the Curtain: Making Opera ‘Not a Dirty Word’

An opera coach at IU has been working to lessen the damage of dismantling arts education in public schools. Kim Carballo’s Reimagining Opera for Kids performs for school children, introducing them to opera and helping to “make opera not a dirty word.” LP columnist Jennifer Pacenza takes a look at ROK in Behind the Curtain. Click here to read the full story.

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IU’s ‘Smash’ Tourney Largest in Indiana History

The popularity of video games has grown into full form, for both players and spectators. The Smash at IUB event on March 25, for instance, will draw nationally ranked players in one of the Midwest’s largest-attended Super Smash Bros. tournaments. Writer Dason Anderson looks into the smashing success of this and other eSports. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Nancy Hiller, Cabinetmaker and Author

Nancy Hiller went from “cobbling together” scraps of wood in her dining room in England to owning a successful woodworking studio in Bloomington. She has also written several noteworthy books about her craft, including her latest, Making Things Work: Tales from A Cabinetmaker’s Life. Read more about Hiller and her many talents in Michael G. Glab’s column, Big Mike’s B-town.

‘Places, Things, People’ 4×5 Photo Gallery: Part 1, Places

In this three-part photography series titled “Places, Things, People,” Adam Reynolds roams the southern Indiana countryside with his new 4x5 “large format” camera — a style that was popular until 35mm film began to hold sway in the mid-1900s. Making pictures with this camera, Reynolds says in his artist's statement, “is a slow, almost meditative, affair.” The results can be striking. Click here to read Reynolds' artist's statement and to see a gallery of his 4x5 photography.

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‘Art in the Underground,’ a Video About the DIY Ethos

Filmmaker Chris Green takes a glimpse at the DIY art community. In Bloomington, DIY art overlaps with more established artist groups in town, including those creating music and film. But, at heart, it maintains its alternative (or punk) approach to creating and enjoying art. Click here to watch the video.

Dada a la Bloomington — a 1920s ‘Anti-Art’ Hotbed

When the absurdist art movement known as Dada began spreading to major cities around the world in the 1920s, it rarely found its way to sleepy Midwestern towns. But writer Michael G. Glab looks into how a soda shop in Bloomington became a hotbed of Dada, courtesy of favorite son Hoagy Carmichael and his friends. Click here to read the full story.