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Arts 53 results

Behind the Curtain: Making Opera ‘Not a Dirty Word’

An opera coach at IU has been working to lessen the damage of dismantling arts education in public schools. Kim Carballo’s Reimagining Opera for Kids performs for school children, introducing them to opera and helping to “make opera not a dirty word.” LP columnist Jennifer Pacenza takes a look at ROK in Behind the Curtain. Click here to read the full story.

IU’s ‘Smash’ Tourney Largest in Indiana History

The popularity of video games has grown into full form, for both players and spectators. The Smash at IUB event on March 25, for instance, will draw nationally ranked players in one of the Midwest’s largest-attended Super Smash Bros. tournaments. Writer Dason Anderson looks into the smashing success of this and other eSports. Click here to read the full story.

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Big Mike’s B-town: Nancy Hiller, Cabinetmaker and Author

Nancy Hiller went from “cobbling together” scraps of wood in her dining room in England to owning a successful woodworking studio in Bloomington. She has also written several noteworthy books about her craft, including her latest, Making Things Work: Tales from A Cabinetmaker’s Life. Read more about Hiller and her many talents in Michael Glab’s column, Big Mike’s B-town.

‘Places, Things, People’ 4×5 Photo Gallery: Part 1, Places

In this three-part photography series titled “Places, Things, People,” Adam Reynolds roams the southern Indiana countryside with his new 4x5 “large format” camera — a style that was popular until 35mm film began to hold sway in the mid-1900s. Making pictures with this camera, Reynolds says in his artist's statement, “is a slow, almost meditative, affair.” The results can be striking. Click here to read Reynolds' artist's statement and to see a gallery of his 4x5 photography.

‘Art in the Underground,’ a Video About the DIY Ethos

Filmmaker Chris Green takes a glimpse at the DIY art community. In Bloomington, DIY art overlaps with more established artist groups in town, including those creating music and film. But, at heart, it maintains its alternative (or punk) approach to creating and enjoying art. Click here to watch the video.

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Dada a la Bloomington — a 1920s ‘Anti-Art’ Hotbed

When the absurdist art movement known as Dada began spreading to major cities around the world in the 1920s, it rarely found its way to sleepy Midwestern towns. But writer Michael G. Glab looks into how a soda shop in Bloomington became a hotbed of Dada, courtesy of favorite son Hoagy Carmichael and his friends. Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: A Drag Legend Is Born in ‘Georgia McBride’

Jennifer Pacenza opens her theater column in Limestone Post with a preview of “fierce, funny” The Legend of Georgia McBride. Pacenza, author of Bravo, Bloomington!, a blog dedicated to local performance, says this Cardinal Stage Company production about the drag community challenges its audience “to consider the permeability of gender and sexuality.” Click here to read the full story.

Theater, Art — ‘Our Mirror to Who We Are’ [video]

David Anspaugh and the cast and crew of Row After Row, a production by Bloomington Playwrights Project, give filmmaker TJ Jaeger a behind-the-scenes look at what their craft means to them, what theater means to the broader world, and why art is important to everybody. Click here to watch the video.

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Since the ’70s, Bloomington Has Been a Midwestern Haven for Punk

Punk rock was a lively part of the Bloomington music scene even before the godfathers of American punk, the Ramones, recorded their first album in 1976. And it is still alive and kicking. Sierra Vandervort looks into the hardcore beginnings of punk and how it has influenced today’s stock of DIY musicians. Click here to read the full story.

Art Mag Publisher Finds His Creative Identity in ‘Spunk’

Aaron Tilford, publisher of the art journal Spunk, wrote in the 10th issue that the intention has always been “to inspire, to explore, to create, and to see things in a new way.” Writer Dason Anderson talks to Tilford about living in New York City, publishing an art magazine, and returning home to Bloomington. Click here to read the full story.