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Food Icon Alice Waters to Help Launch IU Food Project

Some of our favorite restaurants might never have happened without world-renowned chef, author, and food activist Alice Waters. Writer Benjamin Beane spoke to Waters about her visit to Bloomington on April 6-8 to officially launch the IU Food Project, which was created to address the challenges of providing sustainable food for a changing planet. Click here to read the full story.

IU’s ‘Smash’ Tourney Largest in Indiana History

The popularity of video games has grown into full form, for both players and spectators. The Smash at IUB event on March 25, for instance, will draw nationally ranked players in one of the Midwest’s largest-attended Super Smash Bros. tournaments. Writer Dason Anderson looks into the smashing success of this and other eSports. Click here to read the full story.

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Democratic Reforms Needed for Your Vote to Count

Former Bloomington Mayor Tomi Allison and Indiana University Professor Emeritus Jim Allison say our democracy is in urgent need of reform to give voices back to the majority of Americans. They suggest starting with three key efforts: instating the popular vote, eliminating gerrymandering, and creating a rank-choice voting system. Click here to read the full story.

Standing Rock Protestors: ‘Water Is Life’

Protestors at Standing Rock in North Dakota have a simple message: “Mni Wiconi” — Water is life. Or as Laura Reagan, a Bloomington resident and citizen of the Lipan Apache Tribe of Texas, writes, "Life cannot exist without water. We can survive without oil by investing in renewable energy, but we cannot sustain life without clean water." Click here to read the full story.

Becoming Media Literate in a ‘Post-truth’ Era

In the so-called “post-truth” era, says Elijah Pouges, a journalism student at Indiana University, “the reasons to be media literate have never been so dire.” Learning when news sources frames stories for their own agenda can help people become better consumers of the media. Click here to read the full story.

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Paths of Homelessness, Part 1: Your First Day

It's your first day of experiencing homelessness. What do you do? What are your options? Where will you sleep tonight? In the first of this two-part series, writer TJ Jaeger looks at the difficult circumstances people face — and choices they have to make — when they find themselves living on the streets of Bloomington. Click here to read the full story.

More HOPE for Youth in School-to-Prison Pipeline

HOPE, a program started by IU professor Theresa Ochoa, is designed to help youths in juvenile-detention facilities across Indiana. Anne Georgescu follows up her first article on HOPE, showing how the only mentorship program of its kind in the country continues to help break the school-to-prison pipeline for juvenile offenders. Click here to read the full story.

‘Places, Things, People’ 4×5 Photo Gallery: Part 1, Places

In this three-part photography series titled “Places, Things, People,” Adam Reynolds roams the southern Indiana countryside with his new 4x5 “large format” camera — a style that was popular until 35mm film began to hold sway in the mid-1900s. Making pictures with this camera, Reynolds says in his artist's statement, “is a slow, almost meditative, affair.” The results can be striking. Click here to read Reynolds' artist's statement and to see a gallery of his 4x5 photography.

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Dada a la Bloomington — a 1920s ‘Anti-Art’ Hotbed

When the absurdist art movement known as Dada began spreading to major cities around the world in the 1920s, it rarely found its way to sleepy Midwestern towns. But writer Michael G. Glab looks into how a soda shop in Bloomington became a hotbed of Dada, courtesy of favorite son Hoagy Carmichael and his friends. Click here to read the full story.

‘Dear S—’: A Letter from Women’s Marcher to 11-Year-Old Girl

On Saturday, January 21, Ruthie Cohen and two busloads of people arrived in Washington, D.C., after an all-night trip from Bloomington, to participate in the Women’s March on Washington. Afterward, in Bloomington, Ruthie penned a response to a friend’s 11-year old daughter, “S—,” who is skeptical about the march making any difference in the world. Here is her letter.