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Beyond Bloomington 51 results

When Is a Theater an ‘Equity House,’ and Does It Matter?

In its rich and diverse theater community, Bloomington has only one “Equity House.” What does that mean? And is “professionalizing theater” important to a town this size? As Cardinal Stage Company’s Rachel Glago explains in this guest column, yes, because among other benefits it leads to “to overall economic growth.” Click here to read the full story.

Busking 4 Freedom: Jesse Slokum, Unintentional Icon of Woodstock [video]

“Clap your hands, clap your hands!” And a lone figure stands, claps, and dances. Others rise to join him while Richie Havens sings “Freedom! Freedom!” onstage at Woodstock in 1969. In this Duane Busick video, meet Jesse Slokum, Bloomington’s “Busker 4 Freedom” and the man who got multitudes to dance at Woodstock. Click here to watch the video.

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Resistance to the DNR’s Logging of Yellowwood

Several diverse groups have mobilized in recent months to oppose logging in Yellowwood State Forest. The resistance comes to a head this week, as forest advocates, including hundreds of scientists, are asking Gov. Eric Holcomb to call off the plan to cut down trees in Yellowwood’s backcountry and old-growth forest areas. Click here for the full story and how to get involved.

Logging, Runoff in 5 Counties Threaten Health of Lake Monroe

The Lake Monroe watershed — the land and creeks that drain into the lake — includes parts of five counties. Writer Susan M. Brackney looks at a group of “friends” who are safeguarding the lake — along with our drinking water and the plants, fish, and wildlife of Lake Monroe — from the effects of runoff and logging. Click here to read the full story.

9 Hoosier Haunts to Rattle Your Halloween

Ghost stories have been a part of Hoosier lore ever since there have been storytellers. In his first article for LP, writer Grayson Pitts goes in search of spirits, ghosts, and mysterious legends at nine of Indiana’s scariest spots, including a mournful cemetery, a boisterous (but empty) banquet hall, and even “Indiana’s Stonehenge.” Click here to read the full story.

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Rise to Run Trains Young Women to Enter Politics

Bloomington is one of four cities in the U.S. to launch Rise to Run, a new grassroots movement that encourages and trains high school- and college-aged women to run for office. Writer Allison Yates talks to local co-coordinators Regina Moore and Rachel Guglielmo about their program. Click here to read the full story.

Bats! Hoosier Neighbors Deserve ‘Respect and Admiration’

Southern Indiana has some of the country’s largest roosting places for Indiana bats. But these Hoosier mammals face many threats. Writer and bat fan April McKay gives us an in-depth look at these wondrous creatures, and how to help secure their survival — such as attending the Indiana Bat Festival. Click here to read the full story.

World Music Trailblazers Bring Innovative Sounds to Lotus

Music speaks. And it can tell stories. Musical acts Meklit (Ethiopia) and Sabha Motallebi (Iran) will showcase their own forms of musical storytelling this year at the Lotus World Music and Arts Festival. In part 3 of his series, writer Benjamin Beane explores their genre-bending and -expanding music — and the stories they want to tell. Click here to read the full story.

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IU Researcher: Some Species Adapt Faster to Climate Change

IU Research Scientist Adam Fudickar studies animal behavior in response to climate change. “Many parts of the planet that haven’t changed for a really long time are changing very rapidly,” he says. While many species cannot adapt fast enough, some can, which provides hope to researchers. Writer Brian Hartz explores Fudickar’s work on the dark-eyed junco. Click here to read the full story.

‘Stone Country,’ the Land That Carved a People

In her first article for Limestone Post, Yaël Ksander, a producer at WFIU, takes an in-depth look at the collaboration between photographer Jeffrey Wolin and writer Scott Russell Sanders, whose two books (published 30 years apart) are a chronicle of our quarries — the workers, rock, and cultural histories of the Indiana limestone industry. Click here to read the full story.