Advertisement

History 19 results

Local Photographer’s Career Spans the Globe in Stories and Photos

Writer Claude Cookman sits down with photographer Steve Raymer to discuss Raymer's new book, Somewhere West of Lonely: My Life in Pictures. Cookman says Raymer shows how photojournalism is “the essential eyes for citizens in democratic societies to understand an increasingly complex world.” Raymer, an IU emeritus professor, was a veteran National Geographic photographer in the “golden age” of magazine photojournalism. Click here to read the full story and see many of Raymer's photos.

8 Fun and Weird Hoosier Places to Explore This Summer

From nightmares to utopias, from the classic to the kitschy, Indiana has many unique and unconventional places to explore. If you’re uninspired by the same old vacation spots, take a day trip or weekend excursion to these unusual places — all less than a three-hour drive from Bloomington. Writer Allison Yates leads the way. Read the full story here.

Advertisement

Columbus’s Miller House a Crown Jewel of Architecture and Design

While Columbus’s architectural treasures have been admired for decades, it wasn’t until 2011 that the Miller House and Garden, designed by architect Eero Saarinen, opened for public tours. Writer Jenny Elig and photographer Adam Reynolds take us to the family home of J. Irwin and Xenia Miller — and inside the architectural jewel. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Derek Richey, House Hugger

A family project of photographing Bloomington’s history became a mission for Derek Richey to preserve its past. Now he works with a fervor to preserve the houses that give our community so much character, because “that’s why people want to live in Bloomington,” he says in this profile by Michael G. Glab. Click here to read the full story.

Local Conservancy Now Saving Indigenous Languages Worldwide

Since 2005, Bloomington-based nonprofit The Language Conservancy has helped save indigenous languages across the nation. And now, a partnership with the United Nations expands TLC’s efforts worldwide. As writer Michelle Gottschlich’s article says, in addition to revitalizing endangered languages, TLC’s work is about getting people back “to being a human being.” Click here to read the full story.

Advertisement

9 Hoosier Haunts to Rattle Your Halloween

Ghost stories have been a part of Hoosier lore ever since there have been storytellers. In his first article for LP, writer Grayson Pitts goes in search of spirits, ghosts, and mysterious legends at nine of Indiana’s scariest spots, including a mournful cemetery, a boisterous (but empty) banquet hall, and even “Indiana’s Stonehenge.” Click here to read the full story.

Sexy or Racist? Halloween Costumes That Promote Stereotypes

When is a Halloween costume racist? Unless you’re going as a pumpkin, a zombie, or a couple’s salt and pepper shakers, you might consider the offensive message your costume is sending. Writer Laura Martinez shows why a “sexy Indian princess” costume, for example, perpetuates stereotypes and ignores the history of abuse suffered by Native Americans. Click here to read the full story.

Ross Lockridge Jr., a Great American Tragedy

In 1948, Ross Lockridge Jr. died by suicide in Bloomington just months after his best-selling novel, Raintree County, was published. In 2014, Doug Storm interviewed two of Lockridge’s sons for Interchange, his show on WFHB. Here, Storm writes about the sons’ conflicting opinions on the suicide and the assessment of Raintree County as the Great American Novel. Click here to read the full story.

Advertisement

‘Stone Country,’ the Land That Carved a People

In her first article for Limestone Post, Yaël Ksander, a producer at WFIU, takes an in-depth look at the collaboration between photographer Jeffrey Wolin and writer Scott Russell Sanders, whose two books (published 30 years apart) are a chronicle of our quarries — the workers, rock, and cultural histories of the Indiana limestone industry. Click here to read the full story.

Saving Hoosier Agricultural Heritage, One Barn at a Time

Every time you tear down a barn you obliterate a memory, says barn preservationist Duncan Campbell. But he and others are committed to saving what’s left of these legacies of Indiana’s diverse barn heritage. LP writer and editor Dason Anderson looks into their efforts to preserve these treasures of Indiana’s (agri)cultural past. Click here to read the full story.

65 Years of Desegregating Little 5 — at Every Turn

Ever since a team from a Black fraternity raced in the inaugural Little 500 in 1951, the race has had few minority participants. A concerted effort in the 2000s seemed to have broken the color barrier, but today the men’s and women’s races are nearly as white as ever. Sarah Gordon takes an in-depth look at race in the most important race on campus. Click here to read the full story.

Tracks Through Time: The Trains of 1970s Bloomington

In the 1970s, a budding photographer in Bloomington captured images of trains as they passed through the area. Today, Richard Koenig, a professor of art at Kalamazoo College, shares his photographs with Limestone Post, showing how a once essential industry was threaded into the very fabric of town life. Click here to read the full story and to see Koenig's photos.