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History 12 results

Ross Lockridge Jr., a Great American Tragedy

In 1948, Ross Lockridge Jr. died by suicide in Bloomington just months after his best-selling novel, Raintree County, was published. In 2014, Doug Storm interviewed two of Lockridge’s sons for Interchange, his show on WFHB. Here, Storm writes about the sons’ conflicting opinions on the suicide and the assessment of Raintree County as the Great American Novel. Click here to read the full story.

‘Stone Country,’ the Land That Carved a People

In her first article for Limestone Post, Yaël Ksander, a producer at WFIU, takes an in-depth look at the collaboration between photographer Jeffrey Wolin and writer Scott Russell Sanders, whose two books (published 30 years apart) are a chronicle of our quarries — the workers, rock, and cultural histories of the Indiana limestone industry. Click here to read the full story.

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Saving Hoosier Agricultural Heritage, One Barn at a Time

Every time you tear down a barn you obliterate a memory, says barn preservationist Duncan Campbell. But he and others are committed to saving what’s left of these legacies of Indiana’s diverse barn heritage. LP writer and editor Dason Anderson looks into their efforts to preserve these treasures of Indiana’s (agri)cultural past. Click here to read the full story.

65 Years of Desegregating Little 5 — at Every Turn

Ever since a team from a Black fraternity raced in the inaugural Little 500 in 1951, the race has had few minority participants. A concerted effort in the 2000s seemed to have broken the color barrier, but today the men’s and women’s races are nearly as white as ever. Sarah Gordon takes an in-depth look at race in the most important race on campus. Click here to read the full story.

Tracks Through Time: The Trains of 1970s Bloomington

In the 1970s, a budding photographer in Bloomington captured images of trains as they passed through the area. Today, Richard Koenig, a professor of art at Kalamazoo College, shares his photographs with Limestone Post, showing how a once essential industry was threaded into the very fabric of town life. Click here to read the full story and to see Koenig's photos.

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Standing Rock Protestors: ‘Water Is Life’

Protestors at Standing Rock in North Dakota have a simple message: “Mni Wiconi” — Water is life. Or as Laura Reagan, a Bloomington resident and citizen of the Lipan Apache Tribe of Texas, writes, "Life cannot exist without water. We can survive without oil by investing in renewable energy, but we cannot sustain life without clean water." Click here to read the full story.

Dada a la Bloomington — a 1920s ‘Anti-Art’ Hotbed

When the absurdist art movement known as Dada began spreading to major cities around the world in the 1920s, it rarely found its way to sleepy Midwestern towns. But writer Michael G. Glab looks into how a soda shop in Bloomington became a hotbed of Dada, courtesy of favorite son Hoagy Carmichael and his friends. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Cynthia Brubaker, Preservation Developer

Cynthia Brubaker has had more than a hand in preserving some of Bloomington’s most iconic buildings — now homes to some of the town’s favorite galleries, studios, and businesses. This is the second profile in the series Big Mike’s B-town by Michael G. Glab for Limestone Post and based on his WFHB interview show Big Talk! Click here to read the full story.

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6 Places Keeping Bloomington’s History Alive and Personal

When Indiana became a state in 1816, Bloomington was four years from its official incorporation. But the town named after fields of blooming flowers soon became a thriving and growing town. Here are some of the more interesting places that preserve the heritage of their times and help you connect to years past. Click here to read the full story.

200 Road Trips to Explore Hoosier Country’s 200th

Are your travel plans more likely to favor French Lick over France, or Yellowwood over Yellowstone? Do you find road maps more interesting than flight plans? If you’re tempted to hit the road this summer to explore Indiana for its bicentennial, several new books can help guide your way. Click here to read the full story.