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Indiana University 22 results

Helping a Musical Child Foster a Love of Music

Musical children pass through various stages of development, each step requiring different approaches, encouragement, and patience, says Miller Susens, a cellist in the IU Jacobs School of Music. Supporting young musicians encourages individual expression and contributes to a more well-rounded and compassionate human being. Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: The Joy of Summer Theater

Attending summer theater allows us to truly enjoy the moment, says Jennifer Pacenza in her Limestone Post column, Behind the Curtain. And local theater lovers have many shows to choose from in the next few months. In this preview of the IU Summer Theatre season, Jennifer says the lineup promises some “lasting summer memories.” Click here to read the full story.

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Alma Eikerman’s Legacy Still Inspires Metalsmiths, Jewelry Designers

Emerging from the 1940s New York art scene, Alma Eikerman served as a professor at the IU School of Fine Arts for over 30 years, sharing global influences with her students. This month, IU’s current metalsmithing and jewelry design students will display their Eikerman-inspired work at the Indiana University Metals Seminar show. Writer Ann Georgescu tells the story here.

65 Years of Desegregating Little 5 — at Every Turn

Ever since a team from a Black fraternity raced in the inaugural Little 500 in 1951, the race has had few minority participants. A concerted effort in the 2000s seemed to have broken the color barrier, but today the men’s and women’s races are nearly as white as ever. Sarah Gordon takes an in-depth look at race in the most important race on campus. Click here to read the full story.

Food Icon Alice Waters to Help Launch IU Food Project

Some of our favorite restaurants might never have happened without world-renowned chef, author, and food activist Alice Waters. Writer Benjamin Beane spoke to Waters about her visit to Bloomington on April 6-8 to officially launch the IU Food Project, which was created to address the challenges of providing sustainable food for a changing planet. Click here to read the full story.

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IU’s ‘Smash’ Tourney Largest in Indiana History

The popularity of video games has grown into full form, for both players and spectators. The Smash at IUB event on March 25, for instance, will draw nationally ranked players in one of the Midwest’s largest-attended Super Smash Bros. tournaments. Writer Dason Anderson looks into the smashing success of this and other eSports. Click here to read the full story.

Becoming Media Literate in a ‘Post-truth’ Era

In the so-called “post-truth” era, says Elijah Pouges, a journalism student at Indiana University, “the reasons to be media literate have never been so dire.” Learning when news sources frames stories for their own agenda can help people become better consumers of the media. Click here to read the full story.

More HOPE for Youth in School-to-Prison Pipeline

HOPE, a program started by IU professor Theresa Ochoa, is designed to help youths in juvenile-detention facilities across Indiana. Anne Georgescu follows up her first article on HOPE, showing how the only mentorship program of its kind in the country continues to help break the school-to-prison pipeline for juvenile offenders. Click here to read the full story.

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’Tis the Season — for Sports. Keeping Tabs on the Hoosiers

Between the Indiana University football team vying for another bowl appearance and the basketball season starting, sportswriters are busy in Hoosier Nation this month. And thanks to blogs, podcasts, and social media, info about the Hoosiers is at your fingertips. But how do you keep it all straight? Here’s a short list. Click here to read the full story.

Major Shaming: A Jacobs School Student Defends Her Major

Since high school, Miller Susens has known what her career would be: teaching music. But now, as a cellist and junior at IU’s Jacobs School of Music, the music-education major has to answer questions like “Is music even a job?” The “major shaming,” she says, has never silenced her desire to teach. Click here to read the full story.