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Indiana University 17 results

IU’s ‘Smash’ Tourney Largest in Indiana History

The popularity of video games has grown into full form, for both players and spectators. The Smash at IUB event on March 25, for instance, will draw nationally ranked players in one of the Midwest’s largest-attended Super Smash Bros. tournaments. Writer Dason Anderson looks into the smashing success of this and other eSports. Click here to read the full story.

Becoming Media Literate in a ‘Post-truth’ Era

In the so-called “post-truth” era, says Elijah Pouges, a journalism student at Indiana University, “the reasons to be media literate have never been so dire.” Learning when news sources frames stories for their own agenda can help people become better consumers of the media. Click here to read the full story.

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More HOPE for Youth in School-to-Prison Pipeline

HOPE, a program started by IU professor Theresa Ochoa, is designed to help youths in juvenile-detention facilities across Indiana. Anne Georgescu follows up her first article on HOPE, showing how the only mentorship program of its kind in the country continues to help break the school-to-prison pipeline for juvenile offenders. Click here to read the full story.

’Tis the Season — for Sports. Keeping Tabs on the Hoosiers

Between the Indiana University football team vying for another bowl appearance and the basketball season starting, sportswriters are busy in Hoosier Nation this month. And thanks to blogs, podcasts, and social media, info about the Hoosiers is at your fingertips. But how do you keep it all straight? Here’s a short list. Click here to read the full story.

Major Shaming: A Jacobs School Student Defends Her Major

Since high school, Miller Susens has known what her career would be: teaching music. But now, as a cellist and junior at IU’s Jacobs School of Music, the music-education major has to answer questions like “Is music even a job?” The “major shaming,” she says, has never silenced her desire to teach. Click here to read the full story.

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IU to Showcase Artists with Massive Monthly Festival

Recognizing the wealth of “artists and thinkers” on campus, the IU Arts and Humanities Council has created the First Thursdays Festival at Showalter Arts Plaza. The monthly event will “celebrate and showcase” a range of arts — musical, visual, performance, and other creative endeavors — free and open to the public. Click here to read the full story.

Food Insecurity Part 3: Complex Issues Put College Students at Risk

Concluding her three-part series on food insecurity, writer Sarah Gordon found the obstacles to getting healthful food are different for college students than for others — everything from insecurity within their social groups to disasters in their hometowns or countries. She also found an IU student who is doing something about it. Click here to read the full story.

Sanders Is Only Presidential Candidate to Visit Bloomington Before the Primary

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has been the only presidential candidate of either party to visit Bloomington during this campaign season. An enthusiastic crowd greeted him inside and outside of Indiana University Auditorium on Wednesday. Writer/photographer TJ Jaeger captured the event in words and photos. Click here to read the full story.

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6 Things You Didn’t Know About the Jordan Greenhouses

A former quarry? Sunken Gardens? The Passion Pit? And you thought you were looking at greenhouses. Those glass buildings with steamy windows on East 3rd Street have quite the past. And their present is rather colorful, too. Jen Hockney Bratton reveals what you didn’t know about IU's Jordan Greenhouses. Look at some gorgeous photos, too! Click here to read the full story.

Mentorship Program Tries to Break School-to-Prison Pipeline for Juvenile Girls

IU Professor Theresa Ochoa developed HOPE, a mentorship program at the Madison Juvenile Correctional Facility, Indiana’s only maximum-security detention center for girls. Each juvenile is paired with a college student to learn skills she’ll need to finish school or find a job after she leaves the facility. Click here to read the full story.