Advertisement

Research 5 results

Becoming Media Literate in a ‘Post-truth’ Era

In the so-called “post-truth” era, says Elijah Pouges, a journalism student at Indiana University, “the reasons to be media literate have never been so dire.” Learning when news sources frames stories for their own agenda can help people become better consumers of the media. Click here to read the full story.

More HOPE for Youth in School-to-Prison Pipeline

HOPE, a program started by IU professor Theresa Ochoa, is designed to help youths in juvenile-detention facilities across Indiana. Anne Georgescu follows up her first article on HOPE, showing how the only mentorship program of its kind in the country continues to help break the school-to-prison pipeline for juvenile offenders. Click here to read the full story.

Advertisement

Is B-town’s Tap Water Safe? A Full Report

Reports about contaminants in Bloomington’s water supply have caused concern among residents, city officials, and consumer advocates (remember Erin Brockovich?). Journalist Michael G. Glab has looked into the controversy and discovered that drinking any water is a gambler’s game. Here’s his in-depth report on whether our drinking water is safe. Click here to read the full story.

IU Researchers Find Hoosier Support for Trump Is Rooted in Indiana History

Donald Trump’s nomination as the GOP presidential candidate, it’s been widely reported, is due to the economic anxiety of voters and to Trump’s appeal as an authoritarian. But Luke B. Wood, a research associate and policy analyst, and Matthew Fowler, a political science researcher (both at IU), argue that Trump won in Indiana for a different reason — one deeply rooted in Hoosier history. Click here to read the full story.

Mentorship Program Tries to Break School-to-Prison Pipeline for Juvenile Girls

IU Professor Theresa Ochoa developed HOPE, a mentorship program at the Madison Juvenile Correctional Facility, Indiana’s only maximum-security detention center for girls. Each juvenile is paired with a college student to learn skills she’ll need to finish school or find a job after she leaves the facility. Click here to read the full story.

Advertisement