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Family 65 results

Rahim AlHaj: Lotus Blossoms Visiting Artist [video]

Grammy-nominated oud player Rahim AlHaj, an Iraqi political refugee since 1991, was invited by the Lotus Education and Arts Foundation to participate in the Lotus Blossoms outreach program in March. He performed at various Bloomington locations and also at Owen Valley High School in Spencer. Filmmaker TJ Jaeger recorded the trip.

Stirring the Pot: Food Is a Language That Teaches Diversity

Carissa Marks is passionate about food justice. Growing up food insecure in Pennsylvania, she now works with IU Biology Outreach to advocate for sustainable and healthful food systems. One of her projects was an international food festival at Templeton Elementary School. Stirring the Post columnist Ruthie Cohen attended — and learned that “food is language.” Click here to read the full story.

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Paths of Homelessness, Part 2: Demonizing the Less Fortunate

In part 2 of "Paths of Homelessness," TJ Jaeger looks at the stigma dumped on the less fortunate people who experience homelessness. While they sometimes commit “nuisance crimes,” they don’t deserve being verbally and physically harassed, demonized, and treated as second-class humans, say the people who devote their time to helping. Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: Making Opera ‘Not a Dirty Word’

An opera coach at IU has been working to lessen the damage of dismantling arts education in public schools. Kim Carballo’s Reimagining Opera for Kids performs for school children, introducing them to opera and helping to “make opera not a dirty word.” LP columnist Jennifer Pacenza takes a look at ROK in Behind the Curtain. Click here to read the full story.

Know Thyself Part 3: Behavioral Patterns in Your Family Tree

Genograms are like family trees illuminated with the patterns of good and bad behavior of your ancestors. In this third and final article of Know Thyself, writer Samantha Eibling explores genograms and how the behavioral patterns in your family history may inform your behavior. But, she writes, there are ways to override the behaviors that no longer serve you. Click here to read the full story.

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Paths of Homelessness, Part 1: Your First Day

It's your first day of experiencing homelessness. What do you do? What are your options? Where will you sleep tonight? In the first of this two-part series, writer TJ Jaeger looks at the difficult circumstances people face — and choices they have to make — when they find themselves living on the streets of Bloomington. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Guiltless and Often Tastier Shortcuts

Sometimes, taking a shortcut will reveal something new and wonderful; sometimes it just gets the job done faster. In the kitchen, as Ruthie Cohen has discovered several times, something as simple as a jar of salsa could be your eureka moment. Click here to read the full story.

More HOPE for Youth in School-to-Prison Pipeline

HOPE, a program started by IU professor Theresa Ochoa, is designed to help youths in juvenile-detention facilities across Indiana. Anne Georgescu follows up her first article on HOPE, showing how the only mentorship program of its kind in the country continues to help break the school-to-prison pipeline for juvenile offenders. Click here to read the full story.

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Behind the Curtain: A Drag Legend Is Born in ‘Georgia McBride’

Jennifer Pacenza opens her theater column in Limestone Post with a preview of “fierce, funny” The Legend of Georgia McBride. Pacenza, author of Bravo, Bloomington!, a blog dedicated to local performance, says this Cardinal Stage Company production about the drag community challenges its audience “to consider the permeability of gender and sexuality.” Click here to read the full story.

‘Dear S—’: A Letter from Women’s Marcher to 11-Year-Old Girl

On Saturday, January 21, Ruthie Cohen and two busloads of people arrived in Washington, D.C., after an all-night trip from Bloomington, to participate in the Women’s March on Washington. Afterward, in Bloomington, Ruthie penned a response to a friend’s 11-year old daughter, “S—,” who is skeptical about the march making any difference in the world. Here is her letter.