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Kids 20 results

The Importance of Pretending to Be a Dog

Troy Maynard writes about parenting and “the crazy things my kids say” in his blog, Very Vocal Viking. In his first article for Limestone Post, he reflects on his childhood anger and resentment — and how appreciation is the antidote of regret. And, of course, how he learned that from his kids. Click here to read the full story.

WonderLab’s Coral Reef Aquarium Teaches Real Science [video]

There’s something lurking under the waves at WonderLab. Its new Coral Reef Aquarium is designed to “intrigue the expert and engage the young child.” Videographer TJ Jaeger takes a closer look at how WonderLab’s fish-filled tank of fun teaches kids and parents about the importance of ocean sustainability. Click here to watch the video.

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Helping a Musical Child Foster a Love of Music

Musical children pass through various stages of development, each step requiring different approaches, encouragement, and patience, says Miller Susens, a cellist in the IU Jacobs School of Music. Supporting young musicians encourages individual expression and contributes to a more well-rounded and compassionate human being. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Food Is a Language That Teaches Diversity

Carissa Marks is passionate about food justice. Growing up food insecure in Pennsylvania, she now works with IU Biology Outreach to advocate for sustainable and healthful food systems. One of her projects was an international food festival at Templeton Elementary School. Stirring the Post columnist Ruthie Cohen attended — and learned that “food is language.” Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: Making Opera ‘Not a Dirty Word’

An opera coach at IU has been working to lessen the damage of dismantling arts education in public schools. Kim Carballo’s Reimagining Opera for Kids performs for school children, introducing them to opera and helping to “make opera not a dirty word.” LP columnist Jennifer Pacenza takes a look at ROK in Behind the Curtain. Click here to read the full story.

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‘Dear S—’: A Letter from Women’s Marcher to 11-Year-Old Girl

On Saturday, January 21, Ruthie Cohen and two busloads of people arrived in Washington, D.C., after an all-night trip from Bloomington, to participate in the Women’s March on Washington. Afterward, in Bloomington, Ruthie penned a response to a friend’s 11-year old daughter, “S—,” who is skeptical about the march making any difference in the world. Here is her letter.

For Some, Winter Means Outdoor Adventures

Wintertime gives outdoor enthusiasts an experience that fair-weather campers often only pretend to enjoy — seclusion in the great outdoors. In frigid and even subfreezing temperatures, when most people are staying warm inside, campers usually have the forests to themselves. And with the right equipment and preparation, winter camping can offer the best of the outdoors. Click here to read the full story.

Changing the ‘Us and Them’ Feeling in Bloomington Is ‘Imperative’

Through the ONE Community Initiative, the Bloomington Volunteer Network and six local nonprofits are trying to change the “us and them” feeling in the community. Susan M. Brackney spoke with the Volunteer Network’s Lucy Schaich about this shift in volunteering. Focusing on this initiative and these organizations, Schaich says, “is imperative for our community.” Click here to read the full story.

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‘Juniper’ a Gripping Story of Local Family and a Girl ‘Born Too Soon’

The new book Juniper: The Girl Who Was Born Too Soon, by award-winning journalists and IU professors Tom and Kelley French, tells the riveting story of their daughter, Juniper, who was born prematurely — at just 23 weeks. Writer and WFHB radio host Michael G. Glab writes about the family and their book in his first story for Limestone Post. Click here to read the full story.

13 Books to Keep Young Readers Entertained on Those Long Summer Days

Whether your child wants to participate in the library’s Summer Reading Program or just browse The Book Corner, experts agree that reading should be part of every child’s summer fun. Jen Hockney Bratton asks the librarian at University Elementary School, Mary D’Eliso, for suggestions to while away the summer days. Click here to read the full story.