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Recipes 14 results

Stirring the Pot: Guiltless and Often Tastier Shortcuts

Sometimes, taking a shortcut will reveal something new and wonderful; sometimes it just gets the job done faster. In the kitchen, as Ruthie Cohen has discovered several times, something as simple as a jar of salsa could be your eureka moment. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Jewish Soul Food ‘Tastes Like Home’

Stirring the Pot columnist Ruthie Cohen and Limestone Post invite you to share the foods and stories that make your family recipes “taste like home.” We start with kugel — and Ruthie’s memory of how she grew to appreciate the taste and texture of “Jewish soul food” — and how now, she says, they “taste like home.” Click here to read the full story.

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Stirring the Pot: At Thanksgiving, Let ‘the Absurdities’ Creep In

Ruthie Cohen shares her wisdom about what’s most important at Thanksgiving dinner. People often get distracted by the bird, the side dishes, or the presentation. In this edition of Stirring the Pot, she advises not to suppress “the absurdities and silliness that creep in” — and enjoy not knowing how it will all turn out. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Ode to an Auntie — The Blintz and the Brat

In this edition of Stirring the Pot, Ruthie Cohen recalls her childhood when great-aunt Lilly, “a contemporary of George Washington,” would visit from Florida. Although Aunt Lilly spoke in fractured English with a Yiddish accent, when she stepped in the kitchen she spoke through her cooking — eloquently and with love. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Playing Favorites

Before every visit from her children, Ruthie Cohen receives “The Rider,” which contains all the dishes they want her to prepare during their stay. She joyfully complies with their requests — sometimes including a new dish or two — with dessert as the meal's finale. Click here to read the full story.

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Stirring the Pot: Consider the Zucchini

Ruthie Cohen tells us to look at the familiar, the routine, the same old road, with a sense of wonder. “The surprise of rediscovery can be sweet and surprising,” she says. Consider the zucchini. Usually overlooked as a secondary ingredient or a side dish, this commonplace veggie has the makings of a star. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Spring — Such Bounty, Such Joy

Spring brings such a fresh bounty of veggies and greens, the recipes are bound only by your mood and temperament, says Ruthie Cohen. “In food, in fashion, in life, we are always making choices, assembling, reassembling, collecting, discarding.” Making the everyday unique, making the timeless your own, she says, creates loveliness in the world. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Granola, Where More Is Often Less — How Lifelike

Ruthie Cohen has learned that you don’t mess with certain things in life. Her chicken soup, for instance. Or her mother’s meatball recipe. But, usually, as with Ruthie's granola, the recipe changes: Ingredients are added and deleted until, ultimately, the dish is stripped to its delicious essence. How lifelike. Click here to read the full story.

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Stirring the Pot: A Bowl of (Dried) Cherries

Being a friend is a privilege, says Ruthie Cohen. With some friends, talking about cooking and cherries can lead to talk of restaurants, yoga poses, children, grandchildren, and former husbands. For her, friendship is a hallowed institution — a lifeline in stormy seas and a place where we can be our best selves. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Swamped!

A dish doesn’t have to look pretty, or even sound pretty, to be delicious. And Ruthie Cohen’s souplike, stewlike “Swamp” is more than either of those. It’s her own version of Proust’s madeleine, a tasty delight that brings back fond memories of the time a smart-aleck teenager gave the dish its name. Click here to read the full story.