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Healthy Living 55 results

Local Book Lovers Share Their Current Reads

People read books for many reasons, and a highly literate community like ours has voracious readers. Writer Allison Yates spoke to just nine local literati, and she discovered people are reading books that help them to reflect inwardly, learn about (or escape!) the outside world, stay informed, and investigate the past. Click here to read the full story.

Guest Column: Food or Another Need? A Choice Way Too Common

Too many people in our community have to choose between paying for food and some other need — utilities, transportation, medical care, or even housing. Food donations are critical, but the effort is more like treating a symptom than finding a cure, says writer Erin Hollinden, who spoke to local food-insecurity experts for this story. Click here to read the full story.

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Beyond Reading, Adult Literacy Is Survival

Literacy is survival. It’s a housing application, a citizenship test, health insurance, a job that can support a family. Writer Michelle Gottschlich says literacy operates on the question, “Does my level of reading and comprehension empower me?” She shows us several groups helping to break down the barriers to literacy — and empowering people in our community. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Ayurveda, a Holistic Feast

LP columnist Ruthie Cohen stirs up Ayurveda-inspired recipes from health educator Kristin Londergan. A 5,000-year-old holistic physical and spiritual practice, Ayurveda is meant to bring balance into one’s life. Ruthie says the food is “a feast for the eyes, a boon for your gut, a balm for your spirit.” Click here to read the full story.

Resistance to the DNR’s Logging of Yellowwood

Several diverse groups have mobilized in recent months to oppose logging in Yellowwood State Forest. The resistance comes to a head this week, as forest advocates, including hundreds of scientists, are asking Gov. Eric Holcomb to call off the plan to cut down trees in Yellowwood’s backcountry and old-growth forest areas. Click here for the full story and how to get involved.

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Logging, Runoff in 5 Counties Threaten Health of Lake Monroe

The Lake Monroe watershed — the land and creeks that drain into the lake — includes parts of five counties. Writer Susan M. Brackney looks at a group of “friends” who are safeguarding the lake — along with our drinking water and the plants, fish, and wildlife of Lake Monroe — from the effects of runoff and logging. Click here to read the full story.

Guest Column: Changing Minds on Climate Change Is Possible

Since the 2016 election, few people concerned about climate change thought they could have meaningful discussions with climate-science deniers. But members of Citizens' Climate Lobby (CCL) believe their efforts have even encouraged some congressional Republicans to consider a solution to the issue. In this guest column, writer and CCL activist Erin Hollinden explains how. Click here to read the full story.

Bats! Hoosier Neighbors Deserve ‘Respect and Admiration’

Southern Indiana has some of the country’s largest roosting places for Indiana bats. But these Hoosier mammals face many threats. Writer and bat fan April McKay gives us an in-depth look at these wondrous creatures, and how to help secure their survival — such as attending the Indiana Bat Festival. Click here to read the full story.

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Stirring the Pot: Doula Do-Gooder, Leah Rose Hagen

If life hands you zucchinis, make zoocanoes! Leah Rose Hagen has followed her calling to share healthful food with others and to help mothers with newborns. The postpartum doula and founder of Nourish, an in-home chef and catering company, spoke to LP’s resident sage, Ruthie Cohen, about her life’s calling. Click here to read the full story.

IU Researcher: Some Species Adapt Faster to Climate Change

IU Research Scientist Adam Fudickar studies animal behavior in response to climate change. “Many parts of the planet that haven’t changed for a really long time are changing very rapidly,” he says. While many species cannot adapt fast enough, some can, which provides hope to researchers. Writer Brian Hartz explores Fudickar’s work on the dark-eyed junco. Click here to read the full story.