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Outdoors 64 results

Peregrine Falcons, a Conservation Success Story

Peregrine falcons in America have soared back from the brink of extinction since the 1960s, even in Indiana. Just as humans caused their decline, “it was also dedicated humans who brought these birds back,” writes Jared Posey. This “standout conservation success story” is unusual because peregrines “may be benefiting from an increasingly urban landscape.” Click here to read the full story.

Holiday Roundup: Our Top Stories of 2018

Limestone Post Editorial Director Lynae Sowinski presents her annual roundup of our top stories of 2018 — once again showing the wide-ranging interests of our readers. As you enjoy some of the best local writing and photography of 2018, we at Limestone Post and all of our contributors wish you a very happy 2019! As always, thank you for reading! Click here to read the full story.

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City Needs ‘Push’ From Public To Improve Bike Infrastructure

“Bloomington is at a crossroads — culturally, civically, and economically,” says writer Sean Starowitz, assistant director of the arts for the City of Bloomington. Touching on all of these is our bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. While many people say they want a friendlier biking and walking town, “the car dominates its urban fabric and infrastructure.” Click here to read the full story.

A Sense of Belonging — The B-Line Trail’s ‘Sounds of Bloomington Joy’

A sea of golden leaves, front porches, an old railroad bridge, the chatter of downtown … these possess “the reality of what Bloomington is,” writes C. D. Culper. In this second of our two feature stories on having a sense of belonging, Culper says everything Bloomington holds dear is held in “the B-Line’s pulse and patterns.” Click here to read the full story.

Can Bloomington Be Called the ‘Biking Capital of the Midwest’?

While the city’s biking infrastructure leaves much to be desired, Bloomington has plenty to back its claim as the Biking Capital of the Midwest, argues writer and avid biker Sean Starowitz. Whether it’s gravel, road, trail, or mountain biking, Bloomington is the hub of some of the best riding around. Click here for more, including Starowitz's suggestions for routes, clubs, and more.

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Cave Diving in Southern Indiana Takes a Mature Mindset

Samuel Frushour and his cave-diving peers have mapped miles of aquatic caves in southern Indiana. While Hoosier caverns might not have the clear blue waters of tropical caves, they offer an adventure that is increasingly difficult to find in modern times — exploring uncharted territory. Writer Jonah Chester dives into the story. Read the entire story here.

Guest Column: Roots of Community Orchard Spread Across Town

Since 2010, the Bloomington Community Orchard has grown from a grassy acre into a fully planted orchard. But its roots stretch throughout the city, connecting with community members, businesses, and other organizations through skill-sharing classes, partner plantings, and other programs. In this guest column, BCO volunteer Megan Betz writes about the project — and the mysteriously vanishing peaches! Click here to read the full story.

8 Fun and Weird Hoosier Places to Explore This Summer

From nightmares to utopias, from the classic to the kitschy, Indiana has many unique and unconventional places to explore. If you’re uninspired by the same old vacation spots, take a day trip or weekend excursion to these unusual places — all less than a three-hour drive from Bloomington. Writer Allison Yates leads the way. Read the full story here.

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Letter of Response: ‘The Public’s Need for Clean Water’

Advocacy group Friends of Lake Monroe wrote a letter to Limestone Post in response to the article “Property Rights, Public Good, Campaign Contributions” by Susan M. Brackney. In the letter, they argue that the article did not go far enough to address the public’s need for clean water, among other issues. Read the entire letter here.

Azaleas in Full Bloom at Renowned 80-Acre Southern Indiana Garden [video]

Bev Knight’s collection of more than 400 varieties of azaleas started with a UPS delivery to a doctor. Now her family’s Azalea Path Botanical Garden and Arboretum is known nationwide for its woodland flowers (among other plants). Videographer Duane Busick calls the southern Indiana destination "a hidden patch of paradise." Watch his video here.

Property Rights, Public Good, Campaign Contributions: Will Bill to Limit Local Government Be Revived?

A bill introduced in the Indiana House this year would have limited local governments’ ability to regulate such things as logging on private property, even if, for example, the logging threatened to damage Lake Monroe. But it isn’t just about private property vs. public good, writes Susan M. Brackney. Special interest groups and campaign finance play a role, too. Click here to read the full story.

Invasive Plants Are Still For Sale in Indiana, How You Can Help

They’re a centuries-old assault on our environment, but eradicating invasive plants requires more than pulling them out by the roots — especially since big box stores still sell them and red tape in the governor’s office still allows those sales. Writer Susan M. Brackney explains this weedy predicament, and how people can help. Click here to read the full story.