A lone bike rider on the nearly empty streets of Bloomington, Indiana, March 25, 2020. Local officials, organizations, and individuals have developed programs and resources to help people trying to cope during the COVID-19 crisis. | Limestone Post

Bloomington and Monroe County officials, organizations, and individuals have responded to the COVID-19 crisis by developing programs and resources to help people trying to cope in the pandemic. Limestone Post has compiled this list for people who need help, who want to help, or who just want more information. Click here for the list.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent, nonprofit magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. We are a 501(c)(3), and any donation you make to support our local journalism is tax deductible. You can donate here. And, as always, you can subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    March 28, 2020

  • Community Notice

Community Notice

United Way of Monroe County issued a press release announcing that nearly 30 local organizations are launching an emergency relief fund to support "human service organizations in Monroe, Owen, and Greene counties" during the COVID-19 outbreak. According to the press release, grants will be distributed to groups "best positioned to meet the emerging needs resulting from this crisis." | Courtesy image

United Way of Monroe County issued a press release announcing that nearly 30 local organizations are launching an emergency relief fund to support “human service organizations in Monroe, Owen, and Greene counties” during the COVID-19 outbreak. According to the press release, grants will be distributed to groups “best positioned to meet the emerging needs resulting from this crisis.” Click here to read the full press release.

Limestone Post food columnist Ruthie Cohen says her lifelong love affair with dairy, eggs, meat, poultry, and fish has come to an end. But the breakup is not heartbreaking. Rather, she's now in a healthier relationship with a little more spice — and grains, beans, legumes, fruits, and vegetables — a diet harnessing plant power. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

For too many reasons to ignore, LP food columnist Ruthie Cohen says her lifelong love affair with dairy, eggs, meat, poultry, and fish has come to an end. But the breakup is not heartbreaking. Rather, she’s now in a healthier relationship with a little more spice — and grains, beans, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Click here for four of Ruthie’s recipes that harness plant power.

Writer Michael G. Glab says team nicknames and mascots adopted by Indiana’s high schools tell the stories of this 'high school hoops mad' Hoosier state. This 1905 photo shows the Peru High School girls team. Peru would later adopt the nickname the Tigers, as their town was the winter home to many circuses. | Photo courtesy of

As Indiana high schools enter basketball tourney season, writer Michael G. Glab looks at some of the unusual and interesting nicknames and mascots teams have had over the years, as told in the book Hoosiers All by Emerson Houck. From Aces to Zebras, Glab writes, these nicknames tell the stories of this “high school hoops mad” Hoosier state. Click here to read the article.

A project by the Monroe County Plan Commission is designed to turn a 100-acre former quarry property northwest of Bloomington into a limestone heritage park that would highlight the history of the local limestone industry and the art of stonecutting, as well as provide an arts venue open to the public. | Photo by Geoff McKim

Monroe County Commission Plans Limestone Quarry Heritage Park

Writer Laurie D. Borman reports on a project by the Monroe County Plan Commission to turn a 100-acre former quarry property into a limestone heritage park that would highlight the history of the local limestone industry and the art of stonecutting, as well as provide an arts venue open to the public. (Posted: No Swimming.) Click here to read the full story.

Discussions about the controversy at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market have dismissed the voices of Bloomington’s people of color, says historian Ellen Wu. “This is a major omission, considering that African American, Latinx, and Asian American women have made integral interventions into the debate.” Wu interviewed eight of these women to hear what they say is at stake and what solutions can ensure the safety and well-being of everyone at the market.

Bloomington 2019: ‘The Year of the Farmers’ Market Controversy’

Media coverage and discussions about the Bloomington Farmers’ Market have dismissed the voices of Bloomington’s people of color, says historian Ellen Wu. “This is a major omission, considering that African American, Latinx, and Asian American women have made integral interventions into the debate.” For this article, Wu interviewed eight women of color to get their perspectives on the controversy.
Click here to read the article.

Photographer M.J. Bower photographed more than 30 murals in Bloomington to create a Bloomington Mural Trail. This mural, ‘Love This City,’ was painted by Eva Allen on the side of Mother Bear’s Pizza’s east-side location in spring 2019. The full list of murals is at the end of the article, as is a link to The Bloomington Trail Map. | Photo by M.J. Bower

The Murals of Bloomington — Photos and Trail Map

Murals provide “a splash of color” in downtown Bloomington during the winter when most natural color has gone dormant, writes M.J. Bower. She photographed more than 30 local murals for this photo essay on an art form that has existed since prehistoric cave paintings. She also created a Bloomington Mural Trail for some outdoor winter fun. Click here to see the Murals of Bloomington and Trail Map.

Limestone Post Magazine has just become a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. With the need for reliable local news being more important than ever, we are committed to publishing articles that help our readers to make informed decisions about our community. Edited photo of the Monroe County Courthouse in early morning. | Limestone Post

As a New Nonprofit, Limestone Post Will Focus on Community Journalism

We are proud to announce that Limestone Post Magazine has become a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization! With the need for reliable local news being more important than ever, we are committed to publishing articles that help our readers to make informed decisions about our community. Click here to read what this means for Limestone Post and community journalism.

Each fall since 2016, students in Rachel Bahr’s class at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship have completed a class project, called ‘Sense of Place,’ and shared their work with Limestone Post. The ‘places’ covered this year include a quarry, a corn maze, a grandparents’ farm, neighborhoods, parks, and even the activity of creating art. | Photo of Waterfall Shelter in Lower Cascades Park by Bailey Knapp

ASE Students Answer the Question, ‘What Is a Sense of Place?’

Each fall since 2016, students in Rachel Bahr’s class at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship have completed a class project, called “Sense of Place,” and shared their work with Limestone Post. The “places” covered in this year’s videos include a quarry, a corn maze, a grandparents’ farm, neighborhoods, parks, and even the activity of creating art. Click here to watch all 16 videos.

James Ian Mair and James Stevenson have been making films in Greene County since they were ten years old. Their company, Moonlight Films, produces mostly horror films, relying heavily on local talent to put the production together. (l-r): Deron Morgan, special-effects specialist, among other roles; Ben Mair, actor (and brother James Ian Mair); Katie Harbridge, actor; James Stevenson, co-founder of Moonlight Films. | Courtesy photo

Moonlight Films in Greene County Is Hellbent on Horror

Oh, the horror! James Ian Mair and James Stevenson have been making films together in Greene County since they were ten years old. Their company, Moonlight Films, produces mostly horror films, relying heavily on local talent. Their next release, Blood Cove, premieres at the Tivoli Theatre in Spencer on October 27. Click here to read how horror is made in Greene County.

Truth Matters is an event to help people detect disinformation in the news and on social media platforms. After watching two films on the topic, audience members will be able to ask questions to the panel of media experts pictured above: (clockwise from top left) Filippo Menczer, professor at the Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering and director of IU’s new Observatory on Social Media; Jen Senko, director of the film ‘The Brainwashing of My Dad,’ who will participate via Skype; Alex J. Semchuck, associate professor of communication at Ivy Tech Community College in Bloomington; and Jason Peifer, assistant professor at the IU Media School (Courtesy photos). The background image is a screenshot of Hoaxy, a tool that visualizes the spread of articles online, which was created by Menczer and his team at the Observatory on Social Media.

Truth Matters Event To Raise Awareness About Disinformation in the News

Fake news masquerading as journalism? Truth Matters, an event at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater on October 19, features two films and a panel of media experts that will help people detect disinformation in the news and on social media platforms. (Limestone Post is one of 14 sponsors of this event.) Click here to learn more about Truth Matters.

Adam Nahas in Burl and Ingot Tool Library showing a piece of armor that he made. The Tool Library is part of Artisan Alley, the collective art space, studio, workshop, computer lab, gallery, and other projects that began in Nahas’s basement more than a decade ago. | Limestone Post

Big Mike’s B-town: Adam Nahas, Artist’s Artist

The concept of Artisan Alley — the collective art space, studio, workshop, computer lab, gallery, and other projects — began in Adam Nahas’s basement more than a decade ago. But the path from home workshop to one of Bloomington’s largest art collectives was not a straight line. Writer Michael G. Glab maps out Nahas’s journey. Click here for the story.

Community Notice

  • Random Quote

    “It’s not been that long when you look back at when we’ve had those votes. Certainly we need to get out and do that more, fight for what we believe in.” —Owen County Circuit Court Judge Lori Quillen, in "Hoosier Lawyers, Voters Owe Debt to Antoinette Leach" by Diane Walker
  • Community Notice

    Community Notice

    Community Notice

    Community Notice