David Brent Johnson works in the sound booth at WFIU. | Courtesy photo

David Brent Johnson’s encyclopedic knowledge of jazz seems to have come from a lifetime of devotion to the music. But WFIU’s jazz director didn’t “see the light” until his 20s — while drinking coffee in a Kirkwood cafe. Michael G. Glab gets the story of this Bloomington legend in Big Mike’s B-town. Click here to read the full story.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to providing a space for informative, inclusive, and in-depth stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. Our local contributors cover the topics and issues that make this such an interesting place to live. All of our content is free, so browse our archives as much as you like! We’d love to hear your feedback.

    June 18, 2018

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Syd Bohuk’s alarm dings, they swallow a bright blue pill, and continue with their day. Syd says this pill — PrEP, an HIV preventative medication — has become a part of their daily routine, and is much less scary than they had originally anticipated. | Photo by Nicole McPheeters

A medication can lower the risk of contracting HIV by more than 90 percent in some people. But obstacles, including the cost of getting it and the stigma of using it, prevent some people from even trying. Writer Hayley Miller and photographer Nicole McPheeters report on how Positive Link is working to break down these barriers. Click here to read the full story.

Friends of Lake Monroe says, "Our governments must balance the public’s need for clean water for drinking and recreation with the extraction of natural resources on private property." | Photo by Lynae Sowinski

Advocacy group Friends of Lake Monroe wrote a letter to Limestone Post in response to the article “Property Rights, Public Good, Campaign Contributions” by Susan M. Brackney. In the letter, they argue that the article did not go far enough to address the public’s need for clean water, among other issues. Read the entire letter here.

The plight of bees could also be the plight of the human race. When writer Erin Hollinden decided to start her own beehive, and save the world, she found plenty of support from a community of experts and other beekeepers. Here, Hollinden's bees cover one of the frames lifted from the hive. | Photo by Marla Bitzer

The plight of bees could also be the plight of the human race. When writer Erin Hollinden decided to start her own beehive, and save the world, she found plenty of support from a community of experts and other beekeepers. Read about how she got her hive humming here.

One of Columbus’s architectural treasures, the Miller House and Garden, designed by architect Eero Saarinen, opened in 2011 for public tours. The midcentury modern home was built in 1957 as a year-round family home for industrialist and chairman of Cummins Engine Co. J. Irwin Miller and his family. | Photo by Adam Reynolds

Columbus’s Miller House a Crown Jewel of Architecture and Design

While Columbus’s architectural treasures have been admired for decades, it wasn’t until 2011 that the Miller House and Garden, designed by architect Eero Saarinen, opened for public tours. Writer Jenny Elig and photographer Adam Reynolds take us to the family home of J. Irwin and Xenia Miller — and inside the architectural jewel. Click here to read the full story.

Image by Duane Busick

Azaleas in Full Bloom at Renowned 80-Acre Southern Indiana Garden [video]

Bev Knight’s collection of more than 400 varieties of azaleas started with a UPS delivery to a doctor. Now her family’s Azalea Path Botanical Garden and Arboretum is known nationwide for its woodland flowers (among other plants). Videographer Duane Busick calls the southern Indiana destination “a hidden patch of paradise.” Watch his video here.

Block parties, summer fairs, art shows, theater, music, comedy, and festivals galore — these define a Bloomington summer. And that’s just the first weekend! | Courtesy photo

B-town Summer Kicks Off with Busy Weekend June 1-3

Block parties, summer fairs, art shows, theater, music, comedy, and festivals galore — these define a Bloomington summer. And that’s just the first weekend! Writer Benjamin Beane gets us going with a sampling of the events and activities on the first weekend in June. Click here to read the full story.

Single city blocks all over Bloomington generate more rooftop solar energy than the entirety of Indiana University’s Bloomington campus, says writer Matt Flaherty. IU's energy comes overwhelmingly from the burning of fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, and fuel oil). The Indiana Memorial Union (pictured here) is one of only four buildings on the IUB campus with a solar photovoltaic system installed and on the grid. | Limestone Post

Guest Column: IU’s Solar Strategy ‘Shortsighted’

Single city blocks all over Bloomington generate more rooftop solar energy than the entirety of Indiana University’s Bloomington campus, says writer Matt Flaherty in this guest column. What’s most troubling, he says, is that IU’s “dollars-and-cents analysis of solar power is the fundamentally wrong approach for IU to take.” Click here to read the full story.

A family project of photographing Bloomington’s history became a mission for Derek Richey (pictured here on the east side of the downtown Square) to preserve its past. Now he works with a fervor to preserve the houses that give our community so much character. | Limestone Post

Big Mike’s B-town: Derek Richey, House Hugger

A family project of photographing Bloomington’s history became a mission for Derek Richey to preserve its past. Now he works with a fervor to preserve the houses that give our community so much character, because “that’s why people want to live in Bloomington,” he says in this profile by Michael G. Glab. Click here to read the full story.

A bill passed by the Indiana House in February aimed to limit a local government’s authority, but not the state’s, over the right to harvest resources, such as timber, on personal property. The bill died in a Senate committee, but balancing personal property rights with the rights of others who might be affected is an ongoing battle. | Limestone Post

Property Rights, Public Good, Campaign Contributions: Will Bill to Limit Local Government Be Revived?

A bill introduced in the Indiana House this year would have limited local governments’ ability to regulate such things as logging on private property, even if, for example, the logging threatened to damage Lake Monroe. But it isn’t just about private property vs. public good, writes Susan M. Brackney. Special interest groups and campaign finance play a role, too. Click here to read the full story.

With the Indiana primaries over, IU research associate and policy analyst Luke Wood looks at how the Trump era has affected Democratic politicians and voters in Indiana ahead of the 2018 midterm election in November. The election could have a large impact on the makeup of the Indiana Senate and House (the House chambers are pictured here). | Photo courtesy of the Indiana Statehouse

Indiana Democrats and the Politics of White Nativism

Last year, IU research associate and policy analyst Luke Wood wrote an article in LP about a potential clash between Indiana’s moderate Republicans and the Trump administration. Now, with the Indiana primaries over, he looks at how the Trump era has affected Democratic politicians and voters in Indiana ahead of the 2018 midterm election. Click here to read the full story.

Getting the right gift for a mom on Mother’s Day is important. And finding it doesn’t have to be that hard. What would be better for Mom than a bouquet of flowers or a living plant? There are plenty of local options, including nurseries, florists, or venders at the farmers' market, such as Harvest Moon Flower Farm, pictured here. | Limestone Post

A Gift to Match the Magnitude of Mom

Getting the right gift for a mom on Mother’s Day is important. And finding it doesn’t have to be that hard. What would be better for Mom than a bouquet of flowers or a living plant? Writer Jared Posey finds out where to go, what to look for, and how to make it special. Click here to read the full story.

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    "Spreading rapidly, invasives like Asian bush honeysuckle can render forests unrecognizable by shading out native saplings and wildflowers. Some invasives also hybridize native plants. Still others negatively affect soil chemistry. … Poor public awareness, continued sales of invasives, and limited regulation are to blame." —Susan M. Brackney in "Invasive Plants Are Still For Sale in Indiana, How You Can Help"
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