How do people with similar values unite when their methods of action conflict with each other? Writer and organizer Alexandria Hollett says this question is illuminated by “the difference between organizing campaigns on the one hand and symbolic activism on the other.” Pictured here on the east side of Bloomington in 2014 is a Black Lives Matter protest, in solidarity with protesters in Ferguson, Missouri. | Photo by Alexandria Hollett

How do people with similar values unite when their methods of action conflict with each other? Writer and organizer Alexandria Hollett says this question is illuminated by “the difference between organizing campaigns on the one hand and symbolic activism on the other.” Hollett speaks to several local activists about “building the world we all deserve.” Click here to read the full story.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to providing a space for informative, inclusive, and in-depth stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. Our local contributors cover the topics and issues that make this such an interesting place to live. All of our content is free, so browse our archives as much as you like! We’d love to hear your feedback.

    September 19, 2018

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Cristian Medina, a poet, cook, IU researcher, and chess leader from Arica, Chile, moved to Bloomington in the mid-2000s. Pictured here, Medina sits at his desk at the Indiana Geological and Water Survey. | Photo by Chaz Mottinger

Cristian Medina, a poet, cook, IU researcher, and chess leader from Arica, Chile, has found plenty to keep him busy since moving to Bloomington in the mid-2000s. LP columnist Michael G. Glab talks to Medina about his hometown — bordered by ocean, mountains, and desert — geology and climate change, his work founding Cardboard House Press, and more in the latest Big-Mike’s B-town. Click here to read the full story.

Marc Summers, host of the gameshow 'Double Dare,' is back in town for the screening of the documentary 'On Your Marc' at IU Cinema. Writer Jennifer Pacenza talked to Summers and BPP’s Chad Rabinovitz about “Summers’s deeply personal story” and the 2016 BPP play, 'Everything In Its Place' (pictured here), during which much of the documentary was filmed. | Courtesy photo

Marc Summers, host of the gameshow Double Dare, is back in town for the screening of the documentary On Your Marc at IU Cinema. Writer Jennifer Pacenza talked to Summers and BPP’s Chad Rabinovitz about “Summers’s deeply personal story” and the 2016 BPP play, Everything In Its Place, during which much of the documentary was filmed. Click here to read the full story.

If you’re looking to escape the weekend crowds this month, two massive festivals in two tiny towns might just be the ticket. The White River Valley Antique Show and the Lanesville Heritage Weekend are chockfull of authentic Hoosier heritage and late-summer fun. The antique tractor pull, pictured here in Lanesville, is a popular event. | Photo courtesy of the Lanesville Heritage Society

If you’re looking to escape the weekend crowds this month, two massive festivals in two tiny towns might just be the ticket. Writer Patti Danner guides us through what you can expect from the White River Valley Antique Show (Sept. 6-9) and the Lanesville Heritage Weekend (Sept. 13-16). Each are chockfull of authentic Hoosier heritage and late-summer fun. Click here to read the full story.

The MidWay Music Festival is back in B-town with more than 30 women-featured acts. But this year it’s more than just a series of concerts. It’s a nonprofit organization, MidWay Music Speaks, that celebrates and connects women in music and fights for gender equity on stage. | Photo courtesy of MidWay Music Festival

Guest Column: MidWay Music Fest Fights for Gender Equity On Stage

The MidWay Music Festival is back in B-town with more than 30 women-featured acts. But this year it’s more than just a series of concerts. It’s a nonprofit organization, MidWay Music Speaks, that celebrates and connects women in music and fights for gender equity on stage. Writer Rachel Glago has the score. Click here to read the full story.

True crime writer Sarah Kolodziej has been hooked on stories of crime, murder, and suicide since she was five years old. While a case anywhere might grab her eye, most of the ones she writes about on her "Crime Spotlight" blog and Instagram account have ties to Bloomington and Indiana — especially cold cases and unsolved crimes. | Courtesy photo

‘Crime Spotlight’ Writer Does Justice to True Crime Stories

True crime writer Sarah Kolodziej has been hooked on stories of crime, murder, and suicide since she was five years old. While a case anywhere might grab her eye, most of the ones she writes about on her “Crime Spotlight” blog and Instagram account have ties to Bloomington and Indiana — especially cold cases and unsolved crimes. Writer Jonah Chester investigates. Click here to read the full story.

Writer Jennifer Pacenza, pictured far right at a Bollywood dance class, spoke with experts who say a body-positive fitness model is more important for achieving physical and mental well-being than exercise regimens promoted by fitness and weight-loss industries. Pacenza says it's important to find a way that you love to move your body. | Limestone Post

Honoring the Body with Body-Positive Fitness

While many people use exercise regimens hoping to achieve impossibly thin, sculpted bodies promoted by “diet culture,” few people are physically or even genetically capable of achieving such results, says writer Jennifer Pacenza. Experts she talks to say a body-positive fitness model is more important for achieving physical and mental well-being. Click here to read the full story.

Randi Cox, left, and Kathy Gutowsky of Green Camino Inc. originally planned to make their composting business a nonprofit. But after some research, they learned that they could become a benefit corporation or "B corp" — a for-profit business that also strives to create a general public benefit. | Photo by Chaz Mottinger

‘Benefit Corporations’ Reflect New Vision of What Businesses Can Be

Social impact startups — for-profit businesses that also strive to create a general public benefit — can make their intentions official by forming as benefit corporations, or “B corps.” Writer and attorney Erin Martoglio shows how two trailblazing B corps in Bloomington, Green Camino and The Bee Corp, can do more than just turn a profit. Click here to read the full story.

Hoagy Carmichael holds son Hoagy Bix in the early 1940s. More recently, Hoagy Bix was in town for IU Theatre’s production of "Stardust Road: A Hoagy Carmichael Musical Journey," and he talked with writer Michael G. Glab about growing up in Hollywood, his famous namesakes (Hoagy and Bix), and the musical that is premiering in Bloomington. | HC Series 3, Box 3, item 33. Hoagy Carmichael Collection, Archives of Traditional Music, Indiana University

Big Mike’s B-town: Hoagy Bix Carmichael

While Hoagy Bix Carmichael was in town for IU Theatre’s production of Stardust Road: A Hoagy Carmichael Musical Journey, he talked with writer Michael G. Glab about growing up in Hollywood, his famous namesakes (Hoagy and Bix), and the musical that is premiering in Bloomington. They even squeezed in some talk about fly-fishing. Click here to read the full story.

Buying from local farmers is a sure way to avoid foods from who-knows-where and grown with who-knows-what chemicals. And there are a variety of ways to make organic food more affordable, says writer Jared Posey. Be sure to talk to each vendor about their growing methods in order to ensure they are organic. | Limestone Post

Making Organic Food Affordable

Foods from who-knows-where, loaded with marketing claims that mean who-knows-what, can make finding a healthful meal a nightmare, writes Jared Posey. He shares his tips on how to make organic food more affordable — from growing your own organic produce to making your own organic “value-added” products. Click here to read the full story.

In writer Ann Georgescu’s third article on HOPE, an IU mentorship program for youths in juvenile-detention facilities across Indiana, she looks at how one of the young women used poetry to get her through the long days of incarceration. Her poem "Big Brother" was published in "Law and Disorder: An Undergraduate Journal in Special Education and Law." | Limestone Post

Expanded HOPE: Juvenile Offenders Write Poetry to Cope with Incarceration

In writer Ann Georgescu’s third article on HOPE, she looks at how one of the young women used poetry to get her through the long days of incarceration. HOPE is an IU mentorship program for youths in juvenile-detention facilities across Indiana with a mission to help break the school-to-prison pipeline for juvenile offenders.
Click here to read the full story.

Among the many talented people in B-town, writes Ruthie Cohen, some nurture our minds, some our souls, some our bellies. Cohen spoke to a few local women bakers about how they got started. Pictured here are Orange Cardamom Cinnamon Rolls at one of her stops, Two Sticks Bakery. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

Stirring the Pot: Flour, Yeast, Salt, Water, and Love — Bloomington Bakers

Among the many talented people in B-town, some nurture our minds, some our souls, some our bellies, writes Ruthie Cohen. Surround a creative person with “caring mentors and a supportive community, and watch her grow.” In her column, Stirring the Pot, Ruthie profiles a few of the nurturing souls in kitchens across town.
Click here to read the full story.

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  • Random Quote

    “We are aiming to be key UN partners, to help bring more attention to endangered languages worldwide, before it’s too late. Also as a result of our participation at the UN, we are getting approached by more and more language communities worldwide — from Quechua in the Andes, to the Fiji Islands — to help develop projects for them.” —Mitch Teplitsky in "Local Conservancy Now Saving Indigenous Languages Worldwide" by Michelle Gottschlich
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