Jean Magrane (left), who became Bloomington's first woman firefighter in 1987, with Greg Lucas at the “Jiffy Treat training day” in 2006. The fire department is often allowed to use condemned buildings for training purposes before the buildings are destroyed, such as the old Jiffy Treat on Kirkwood Avenue. | Courtesy photo

After Jean Magrane became the city’s first female firefighter in 1987, it took years for most of her male colleagues to accept her as an equal. But she persevered because she valued the work more than any other job she’d had. Writer Michael G. Glab tells the story of this barrier-breaking firefighter. Click here to read the full story

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to providing a space for informative, inclusive, and in-depth stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. Our local contributors cover the topics and issues that make this such an interesting place to live. All of our content is free, so browse our archives as much as you like! We’d love to hear your feedback.

    April 21, 2018

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They’re a centuries-old assault on our environment, but eradicating invasive plants, such as the Callery pear tree (pictured here along the streets of Columbus, Indiana) requires more than pulling them out by the roots — especially since big box stores still sell them and red tape in the governor’s office still allows those sales. | Photo by Larry Brackney

They’re a centuries-old assault on our environment, but eradicating invasive plants requires more than pulling them out by the roots — especially since big box stores still sell them and red tape in the governor’s office still allows those sales. Writer Susan M. Brackney explains this weedy predicament, and how people can help. Click here to read the full story.

Troy Maynard (pictured here as a child with his father) spent many years angry at his troubled father, but that changed when Troy began having children and realized fatherhood wasn’t just putting “bad drawings on your fridge.” | Courtesy photo

Troy Maynard spent many years angry at his troubled father, but that changed when Troy began having children and realized fatherhood wasn’t just putting “bad drawings on your fridge.” In this edition of his LP column, My Dad Voice, Maynard reflects on their relationship, and how “you can’t get the good stuff without the heat.” Click here to read the full story.

Knowing where your food comes from is more important than ever. With the first Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market of the season on Saturday, getting to know the farmers who produce it is easier than ever. Photographer Chaz Mottinger visited three farms to give us a closer look as they prepare for the spring market season: Barnhouse Farms, Linnea's Greenhouse, and Living Roots Farm and Sustainable Living Center (pictured here). | Photo by Chaz Mottinger

Knowing where your food comes from is more important than ever. With the first Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market of the season on Saturday (and markets in Ellettsville and Smithville starting soon), getting to know the farmers who produce it is easier than ever. Photographer Chaz Mottinger visited three farms to give us a closer look as they prepare for market. Click here to see her photos.

"Pollinating Projectiles!, To Bee or Not To Bee" is one of many paintings in Joe and Bess Bohon Lee's exhibition, Professor Animalia’s Menagerie of Struggling Species. The show will take place throughout the month of April at Blueline Gallery. | Courtesy image

‘Professor Animalia’s Menagerie of Struggling Species’ Opens at Blueline Gallery

Ladies and Gentlemen, step right up to see Professor Animalia’s Menagerie of Struggling Species! Witness with your own eyes more than a dozen circus-midway banners depicting rare and endangered species. The exhibition by artists Joe and Bess Bohon Lee opens April 6 at Blueline Gallery. Writer Claude Cookman takes us inside the “tent.” Click here to read the full story.

Photographer and activist Richard Ross will be in Bloomington for a two-day interdisciplinary arts program, showing his photography series Juveniles in Justice, conducting a workshop, and discussing how artists can create “in a time of rage,” among other events. | Photo courtesy of Richard Ross

Visiting Photographer Engaging Local Groups in Project ‘Juvenile in Justice’

Photographer and activist Richard Ross will be in Bloomington for a two-day interdisciplinary arts program, showing his work on juvenile justice and discussing how artists can create “in a time of rage,” among other events. One of his former assistants, Rachel Glago, writes about his work and how a dozen local groups are getting involved. Click here to read the full story.

Director Jonathan Michaelson, second from left, chats with (l-r) Nina Donville (Jasmine), Talia Santia (multiple characters), and Longfei Zhao (Maurice) during a rehearsal of "Nice Nails." | Photo by Chaz Mottinger

Behind the Curtain: ‘Nice Nails,’ A Play That Cuts to the Quick

Social issues are rarely black and white, as revealed in Nice Nails, a play by Aaron Ricciardi, presented by IU’s theatre department. LP columnist Jennifer Pacenza looks Behind the Curtain at the circumstances in which a Korean family, a South African immigrant, and a trans man are entangled in labor-law violations in Long Island nail salons. Click here to read the full story.

Pat East, founder of Hanapin Marketing and an investor in local tech start-ups, mentors local entrepreneurs to help them avoid the pitfalls he encountered along the road to success. | Courtesy photo

Big Mike’s B-town: Pat East, Tech Guru

LP columnist Michael G. Glab goes high tech! Well, at least, he talks to high-tech guru Pat East, who co-founded Hanapin Marketing and works with local start-ups and organizations such as Dimension Mill, Inc. East also mentors local entrepreneurs hoping to avoid the pitfalls he encountered along the road to success. Click here to read the full story.

The Ivy Tech Storytelling Series focuses on divisive issues — such as race, reproductive rights, and immigration — and makes them personal. In this guest column, Reverend Forrest Gilmore, pictured here at a dress rehearsal for the second live-storytelling event, recalls a heart-wrenching experience from his past. He also shows how stories help us make sense of our lives and are an “opportunity to expand our capacity for community.” | Courtesy photo

Guest Column: Ivy Tech Storytelling Series Connects People in ‘a Different Way’

The Ivy Tech Storytelling Series focuses on divisive issues — race, reproductive rights, immigration — and makes them personal. In this article, Reverend Forrest Gilmore recalls a heart-wrenching experience from his past, but he also shows how stories help us make sense of our lives and are an “opportunity to expand our capacity for community.” Click here to read the full story.

Some Hoosier farmers raise millions of animals that spend much of their lives in confinement — their sole existence in these “Confined Feeding Operations” is to get plump enough for market. But some of these animals, such as the pig pictured here, are rescued and find their way to Uplands PEAK, a farm animal sanctuary. | Photo by Alexianna Mundy, Paulina M Photography

Sanctuary Moving, Growing, Giving Farm Animals Freedom

Some Hoosier farmers raise millions of animals that spend much of their lives in confinement — their sole existence in these “Confined Feeding Operations” is to get plump enough for market. But some of these animals are rescued and find their way to Uplands PEAK, a farm animal sanctuary. Writer Susan M. Brackney writes more about the refuge. Click here to read the full story.

Iron casting crew in front of the historic Telford furnace in Coalbrookdale, England, at the International Conference of Contemporary Cast Iron Art 2009. From left, Chris Johns, Rick Batten, Will Vannerson, Nate Hensley, Chris Gerber, and Gerry Masse. The crew stands with Lady Dianne, the furnace they built, now in use at Sculpture Trails Outdoor Museum in Solsberry. | Courtesy photo

‘Black Panther’ Scene Forges Opportunity at Sculpture Trails

For a story in the Greene County Daily World, staff writer Patti Danner interviewed Gerry Masse, owner and founder of the Sculpture Trails Museum in Solsberry, in which Masse reveals the connection between a sculpture in the hit movie Black Panther and a Slovakian artist getting an internship at the Sculpture Trails. Story reprinted by permission. Click here to read the full story.

Hikers wander along the trails at Sycamore Land Trust’s Porter West. Writer Jonah Chester describes the preserve as a “diamond in the rough,” with sinkholes, a former composting site, and a cemetery. | Limestone Post

Porter West: Sycamore Land Trust’s ‘Diamond in the Rough’

A lot goes into preserving the natural beauty of an area — but sometimes that means just letting it be. Sycamore Land Trust’s Porter West Preserve, for example, includes a former composting site, sinkholes, and a cemetery. Writer Jonah Chester explores how SLT manages problems like invasive species in such “diamonds in the rough.” Click here to read the full story and to see many photos of Porter West.

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  • Random Quote

    "Farmers’ markets are not only a chance to buy fresh organic products, but there are also opportunities to get to know the people who produce those goods. The farmers are glad to talk about what they’re selling and the production methods they use." —Introduction to "Local Farmers Prepare for Spring Market Season," photography by Chaz Mottinger
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