Limestone Post published a photo gallery and article on the peaceful march and protest, called ‘Enough Is Enough,’ that was held on June 5 in Bloomington in response to nationwide police brutality against Blacks and other people of color. Organizers emphasized that, although people’s energy at the event was encouraging, the fight for racial justice will be an ongoing battle. | Limestone Post

As we look forward to 2021, it might serve us well to remember how our community responded with remarkable resilience and resolve to the challenges we faced — and continue to face — in this exceptionally challenging year. Limestone Post’s talented and dependable contributors kept us informed on many of the important topics of the time. Click here to read about LP’s Top Stories of 2020.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    January 19, 2021

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Community Notice

Abattoir Gallery, a new gallery at 4th and Rogers streets in Bloomington, will exhibit across mediums while maintaining a safe space for LGBTQ+, Black, and brown people, says its lead curator, Gnat Bowden. Writer Ian Carstens says Abattoir “is an open door to the streets of Bloomington to challenge its anti-Black, anti-LGTBQ+ realities.” | Photo by Ian Carstens

Abattoir Gallery, at 4th and Rogers streets in Bloomington, will exhibit across mediums while maintaining a safe space for LGBTQ+, Black, and brown people, says its lead curator, Gnat Bowden. Writer Ian Carstens attended the soft opening and says Abattoir “is an open door to the streets of Bloomington to challenge its anti-Black, anti-LGTBQ+ realities.” Click here to read about Abattoir Gallery.

Limestone Post Magazine launched in 2015, but this month we’re celebrating our one-year anniversary as a nonprofit. Despite the challenges of 2020, we’ve made progress in various ways and plan to carry that momentum into 2021. This painting, by Mark W. Ratzlaff, was included in our first print edition, ‘A Sense of Place,’ published in 2018. Used by permission. | ‘Bloomington, View over the rooftops #2,’ by Mark W. Ratzlaff, 2016, oil on canvas on board

Although Limestone Post Magazine launched in 2015, this month we’re celebrating our one-year anniversary as a nonprofit! What a year. Despite the challenges, we’ve continued publishing important stories and have made progress in other significant ways. We’re carrying that momentum into 2021 with renewed hope and enthusiasm. Click here to read about Limestone Post’s past, present, and future.

‘IU 2020’ is a documentary series that began in 2016 and follows 12 Indiana University students during the entirety of their undergraduate careers. Jennifer Piurek, director of communications and special projects at IU’s Office of the Provost, wrote about the students and the project for Limestone Post. On December 8, films will be screened on the three students above (l-r): Broderick Balsley, Jayla French, and Courtland Crenshaw. | Courtesy images

“IU 2020” is a documentary series that began in 2016 and follows 12 Indiana University students during the entirety of their undergraduate careers. Jennifer Piurek, director of communications and special projects at IU’s Office of the Provost, wrote about the students and the project — and the free screening on December 8. Click here to learn about “IU 2020.”

For the 5th straight year, students in Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship have completed a class project, called ‘Sense of Place,’ and shared their work with Limestone Post. Above is a screenshot from student Jaidyn Cooper’s video about Campbell's Park in Ellettsville.

ASE Students Complete Annual ‘Sense of Place’ Project Despite Pandemic

The annual “Sense of Place” project by students at The Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship shows “a sliver of each student’s identity,” writes student Richelle Elkes. But each student’s video, she adds, “gives the viewer a greater understanding of the young people in the community and how their values affect the community of Bloomington.”
Click here to read about the project and watch their videos.

Origin Park is a 600-acre urban park project along the Ohio River that will connect Jeffersonville, Clarksville, and New Albany, Indiana. Encompassing the Falls of the Ohio State Park and Ohio River Greenway, the park will feature 35 miles of park lawns, 22 miles of trails, and 4.5 miles of paddle trails. One of the highlights of the park is called the Infinity Loop, a 2.8 mile elevated trail that will allow visitors to walk over the river. Illustrated above is a section called The Flatwater. | Image courtesy of River Heritage Conservancy, Inc.

‘Amphibious’ Park in Clarksville Anticipates Climate Change Impact

Water volume in the Ohio River is expected to increase by 30 percent over the next 50 years. But a 600-acre park being developed in southern Indiana will turn the inevitable flooding into an attraction, making it “the first climate-resilient park in the Midwest.” Click here to read the story by Beth Edwards of the Indiana Environmental Reporter.

Limestone Post food columnist Ruthie Cohen (left) created four dishes inspired by her daughter Leigh. | Photo by Aviva Orenstein

Stirring the Pot: Spice Girl

Limestone Post’s food sage, Ruthie Cohen, settles a domestic dispute by offering us recipes inspired by her daughter Leigh, the last of the Cohen kids to be featured in her column. Ruthie says Leigh “embodies the essential ingredients that ignite: a zest for life, a fire in her belly, a brash sizzle, and a subtle hint of sweetness.” Click here for Ruthie’s Leigh-inspired recipes.

‘Paper Pavilions’ is a group exhibition of Midwestern artists, showing virtually and physically at the 411 Gallery in Columbus, Indiana. Curated by Sean Starowitz, the City of Bloomington’s assistant director for the arts, the exhibition allows artists to set the tone for the future of public art. Pictured is ‘Mutant Bower’ by the Carlson Garcia collective. | Photo by Ian Carstens

‘Paper Pavilions’ Exhibition Looks at Race, Nature, and Public Art

‘Paper Pavilions’ is a group exhibition of Midwestern artists, showing virtually and physically at the 411 Gallery in Columbus, Indiana. Curated by Sean Starowitz, the City of Bloomington’s assistant director for the arts, the exhibition allows artists to set the tone for the future of public art. Click here to read a review from writer and photographer Ian Carstens.

Volunteers stock tables and shelves before opening the People’s Open Pantry on a recent Saturday at Artisan Alley. People’s Open Pantry, or POP, is a new initiative under the aegis of the People’s Market, whose mission is to build equity and support community access to healthy food, writes Ellen Wu. | Limestone Post

New People’s Open Pantry Offers Access to Healthy Food

Building equity and supporting community access to healthy food are at the heart of the People’s Open Pantry, a new initiative under the aegis of the People’s Market, writes Ellen Wu. But starting a pantry during a pandemic takes dedication and planning. Wu talked to several of the people involved in the effort.
Click here to read the story.

Actors in the Emerging Theatre Artist Residency rehearse a play at Krista Detor and Dave Weber’s artist retreat, The Hundredth Hill, in northern Monroe County. Since moving to the retreat in August, these recent graduates from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts have been working on two productions that they will perform for live audiences on a custom-built, outdoor stage. | Limestone Post

Theater Residency at The Hundredth Hill Creates Art During Pandemic

Krista Detor and Dave Weber’s artist retreat, The Hundredth Hill, has served since August as a theater residency for a troupe of recent graduates from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Not only has the group created two productions but they will also perform them for live audiences — an all but unheard-of feat in theater during the pandemic. Click here for the story.

Charlotte Zietlow holds up a campaign brochure for the 1971 election in Bloomington when she was elected to the city council. Before becoming a local political powerhouse, Charlotte and her husband, Paul, spent a year in Czechoslovakia as part of an educational exchange program. She says in her new memoir, “Minister’s Daughter: One Life, Many Lives,” with Michael G. Glab, that the experience proved American democracy was worth fighting for. | Limestone Post

Book Excerpt: ‘Minister’s Daughter: One Life, Many Lives’ by Charlotte Zietlow

Before becoming a local political powerhouse in Bloomington, Charlotte Zietlow and her husband, Paul, spent a year in Czechoslovakia as part of an educational exchange program. She says in her new memoir, “Minister’s Daughter: One Life, Many Lives,” with Michael G. Glab, that the experience proved American democracy was worth fighting for. Click here to read an excerpt from the book.

Art galleries are adapting to ever-changing conditions during the pandemic. Photographer Paige Strobel visited several local galleries for Limestone Post, to find out how they are welcoming visitors — in-person, online, or both. Pictured is Untitled, 2009, by El Anatsui, a recent acquisition by the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art. | Photo by Paige Strobel

Galleries Adapt to Pandemic While Artists Continue to Create [Photo Essay]

Art galleries are adapting to ever-changing conditions during the pandemic. Photographer Paige Strobel visited several local galleries to find out how they are welcoming visitors — in-person, online, or both. “While the world looks different and extra precautions are in place,” she writes, “one can still experience the incredible artists and artistry this town offers.” Click here for Paige’s story and photos.

Community Notice

  • Random Quote

    “I was trying my best to impress a guy. So I came home one day and found two dead flies lying next to one another. I picked the two flies up, put them on paper, drew around them, and I’ve done it every day since. The guy never worked out.” —Ali Beckman, in "Bugs Come to Life in Ali Beckman’s So Fly Taxidermy" by Dason Anderson
  • Community Notice

    Community Notice

    Community Notice

    Community Notice