| Map: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2021, cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm

For more than two decades, the opioid epidemic has raged on in small rural towns and in the suburbs. But what happens when the opioid epidemic collides with the COVID pandemic? Rebecca Hill writes about these “waves” of crises in Bloomington and other southern Indiana communities, and how people are weathering it. Click here to read the story.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    August 4, 2021

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Angel Mounds Historic Site, along the Ohio River just east of Evansville, was a bustling town and trading hub for Native American people during the Mississippian Culture Period, prior to European colonization. Beginning in the 1930s, the remains of 700 individuals were excavated from the site and stored at Indiana University until March 2021, when they were repatriated. | Photo by Laura Martinez

Angel Mounds, outside of Evansville, was a bustling trading hub for Native American people prior to European colonization. Historian Laura Martinez writes about the recent repatriation of the remains of 700 individuals that were excavated from the site in the 1900s — and how, even at sacred places like Angel Mounds, the spiritual practices of Native Americans are still violated. Click here to read about Angel Mounds.

Within a two-hour drive from Bloomington, you can take road trips to such diverse places as quintessential Hoosier small towns and atypical Hoosier landscapes (pictured above, the DePauw Nature Park). As writer Diane Walker says, these fun, unusual, and affordable destinations will nourish our mental and physical health with hiking, exploring, and exercising our curiosity — and help us to emerge from our ‘unprecedented isolation.’ | Limestone Post

All of us need a fun break, especially after 14 months of unprecedented isolation, and what’s a better getaway than a good road trip? Writer Diane Walker takes us to waterfalls, small towns, and several fun, affordable, and unusual sites on these “road trips of distinction” — all within a two-hour drive of Bloomington. Click here to join the ride!

Research by Alex Jahn at Indiana University has focused on the rarely studied American robin. For Jahn, birds are sentinels because they can predict what is happening to our ecosystem. Jahn and other researchers around the world use technology such as satellite telemetry to understand how migration affects the lives of birds. With a reported 30 percent of bird species lost since the 1970s, writes Rebecca Hill, the information gathered is more important than ever. | Photo by Skyler Ewing

In 1803, James Audubon tracked birds by tying thread around their legs. Researchers around the world now use technology such as satellite telemetry to understand how migration affects these “sentinels” of our ecosystem. With a reported 30 percent of bird species lost since the 1970s, writes Rebecca Hill, the information gathered is more important than ever. Click here to read the article.

Recent mass shootings have ignited conversations about “the precarious ambiguity about what it means to be Asian American,” says Hiromi Yoshida, a freelance writer, editor, and diversity consultant for the Writers Guild at Bloomington. For Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, the Writers Guild will feature four Asian American performers for the virtual edition of its First Wednesdays Spoken Word Series on May 5. “To be Asian, however American, is dangerous in this volatile post-Trump era,” Hiromi writes. | Courtesy images.

Writers Guild Spoken Word Series: Observing Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month

For Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, the Writers Guild at Bloomington is featuring four Asian American performers for the virtual edition of its First Wednesdays Spoken Word Series on May 5. Writer Hiromi Yoshida wrote a preview of the event for LP. “To be Asian, however American, is dangerous in this volatile post-Trump era,” Hiromi writes. Click here for Hiromi’s article.

Bachelor Nation is the love–hate cultural bubble comprising the fans, podcasts, blogs, and adjacent programming of reality shows ‘The Bachelor’ and ‘The Bachelorette.’ This spring, real-life drama involving racism, sexism, inclusivity, and diversity have taken center stage. Jennifer Piurek explains it all in this article for her LP column ‘Love to See It.’ | Image by Jenny El-Shamy

Love to See It: Eats, Shoots and Leaves Bachelor Mansion

Bachelor Nation is the love–hate cultural bubble comprising the fans, podcasts, blogs, and adjacent programming of reality shows The Bachelor and The Bachelorette. This spring, real-life drama involving racism, sexism, inclusivity, and diversity have taken center stage. Jennifer Piurek explains it all in this article for her LP column Love to See It. Click here to read Jennifer’s column.

Hoosiers living in southern Indiana counties face significant health threats, including chronic disease, substance abuse, and mental health issues. Access to rural healthcare is another threat, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Writer Rebecca Hill looks at the problem of rural healthcare access and what various individuals and organizations are doing to help. | Illustration by Christian Bowden

Healthcare and the Impact of COVID-19 in So. Indiana Counties

The most significant health threats faced by Hoosiers living in southern Indiana’s rural counties are chronic disease, substance abuse, and mental health issues. Another threat is access to healthcare, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Writer Rebecca Hill looks at the problem of rural healthcare access and what various individuals and organizations are doing to help. Click here to read the article.

Ruthie Cohen stirs the pot this month with paprika-rich Hungarian bean soup, courtesy of Valeria Varga, senior lecturer in IU’s Hungarian Studies Program. Valeria infuses her classes with conversation about cuisine and includes cooking demonstrations in the summer courses she teaches. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

Stirring the Pot: Valeria Dreams of Paprika

Ruthie Cohen stirs the pot this month with paprika-rich Hungarian bean soup, courtesy of Valeria Varga, senior lecturer in IU’s Hungarian Studies program. Hungary is known for its paprika, and Valeria makes cooking demonstrations an essential part of her summer courses. “There is nothing like the aroma and the color of paprika,” Valeria says. Click here for Ruthie’s story and Valeria’s recipe!

While the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana peaked nearly 100 years ago, its members’ support of Christian nationalism is reflected in various political, militia, and hate groups today. Writer Laurie D. Borman interviewed several experts who suggest the ideologies espoused by today’s far-right groups are a continuation of the country’s racist past. This photo is of a KKK cross burning in northern Indiana in 1922.

‘100% American’ Hate Groups, Christian Nationalism, and the Indiana KKK

While the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana peaked nearly 100 years ago, its members’ support of Christian nationalism is reflected in various political, militia, and hate groups today. Writer Laurie D. Borman interviewed several experts who suggest the ideologies espoused by today’s far-right groups are a continuation of the country’s racist past. Click here to read the article.

In the past 25 years, the housing supply in Bloomington has not kept pace with population growth, and housing prices have gone up while wages have remained flat. Housing expert Deborah Myerson says exclusionary housing policy creates issues related to housing affordability, accessibility, racial inequity, and climate change — as well as invisible neighbors in our community. The photos above depict examples of “missing middle housing,” courtesy of NeighborsUnited.info.

Invisible Neighbors: How To Include People Left Out of B-town’s Neighborhoods

In the past 25 years, housing supply in Bloomington has not kept pace with population growth, and prices have gone up while wages have remained flat. Housing expert Deborah Myerson says exclusionary housing policy creates issues related to housing affordability, accessibility, racial inequity, and climate change — as well as invisible neighbors in our community. Click here to read Deborah’s article.

The 27th Soup Bowl Benefit for Hoosier Hills Food Bank will include locally made soup bowls and a livestream music show featuring Carrie Newcomer, Keb’ Mo’, Joshua Bell, IU Soul Revue, Busman’s Holiday, Malcolm Dalglish, Ross Gay, Sam Bartlett, and Eric Schedler. This photo shows a 2020 performance by Soup Bowl co-founder Newcomer (with guitar) with chamber choir Voces Novae. | Photo by Duane Busick

Soup Bowl Benefit Oral History + What To Expect This Year

Duane Busick’s oral history of the Soup Bowl Benefit, in words and video, gives a behind-the-scenes look at the event that has raised $1.5 million for the Hoosier Hills Food Bank since 1994. This year, the 27th Soup Bowl includes actual soup bowls and a livestream music show. Click here for Duane’s oral history and to learn about this year’s event.

How does pop culture help us express what it is to be human? In her Limestone Post column, ‘Love to See It,’ Jennifer Piurek will explore why trends, words, and various art forms help us ‘both navigate the world and care about life experiences different from our own.’ | Image by Jenny El-Shamy

Love to See It: Culture & Words Getting Us Through This Thing Called Life

How does pop culture help us express what it is to be human? Jennifer Piurek will explore this and other themes in her Limestone Post column, “Love to See It” — her take on why trends, words, and various art forms help us “both navigate the world and care about life experiences different from our own.” Click here to read Jennifer’s first column!

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    “I was trying my best to impress a guy. So I came home one day and found two dead flies lying next to one another. I picked the two flies up, put them on paper, drew around them, and I’ve done it every day since. The guy never worked out.” —Ali Beckman, in "Bugs Come to Life in Ali Beckman’s So Fly Taxidermy" by Dason Anderson
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