Resolving conflicts between offenders and victims with restorative rather than punitive measures allows the offender to repair the damage and the victim to heal. Writer Ann Georgescu explores restorative justice, mediation, and other methods used by the nonprofit Community Justice and Mediation Center as alternative approaches to the criminal justice system. | Photo by Ann Georgescu

Resolving conflicts between offenders and victims with restorative rather than punitive measures allows the offender to repair the damage and the victim to heal. Writer Ann Georgescu explores restorative justice, mediation, and other methods used by the nonprofit Community Justice and Mediation Center as alternative approaches to the criminal justice system. Click here to read the full story.

Home Sidebar

  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to providing a space for informative, inclusive, and in-depth stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. Our local contributors cover the topics and issues that make this such an interesting place to live. All of our content is free, so browse our archives as much as you like! We’d love to hear your feedback.

    December 16, 2018

  • Advertisement

Advertisement

“Bloomington is at a crossroads — culturally, civically, and economically,” says writer Sean Starowitz, assistant director of the arts for the City of Bloomington. Touching on all of these is our bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. While many people say they want a friendlier biking and walking town, “the car dominates its urban fabric and infrastructure,” which can be seen in this shared lane on North Walnut at the downtown Square. | Limestone Post

“Bloomington is at a crossroads — culturally, civically, and economically,” says writer Sean Starowitz, assistant director of the arts for the City of Bloomington. Touching on all of these is our bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. While many people say they want a friendlier biking and walking town, “the car dominates its urban fabric and infrastructure.” Click here to read the full story.

Photo by Gannon Holsapple

For the third straight year, students in Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at the Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship have explored a specific place that has special meaning to them — from their own backyard to Griffy Lake to high above the city. In 15 immersive audio tours, they each share their unique sense of place. Click here to watch their videos!

Courtesy photo

“Everything inside me — starting with my name, Vauhxx — spoke to me and said I had to speak up,” says Vauhxx Booker, spokesperson for Bloomington’s Black Lives Matter. He also spoke with writer Michael G. Glab about his family’s deep-rooted American history, his shy childhood, and his potential plans for public office in Bloomington. Click here to read the full story.

‘The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?’ is “a difficult play for both directors and actors,” writes LP’s performance columnist Jennifer Pacenza. But IU’s production of this Tony Award-winning play by Edward Albee is also “emotional but liberating,” one that will give audiences “a flurry of emotions — love, betrayal, disgust, pity, and delight.” In the play, a secret tears apart Martin Gray (played by Jay Hemphill, on couch) and his wife, Stevie (Glynnis Kunkel-Ruiz), and son, Billy (Josh Hogan) — “a perfect American family.” | Courtesy photo

Behind the Curtain: IU’s ‘The Goat’ Built On Vulnerability and Trust

‘The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?’ is “a difficult play for both directors and actors,” writes LP’s performance columnist Jennifer Pacenza. But IU’s production of this Tony Award-winning play by Edward Albee is also “emotional but liberating,” one that will give audiences “a flurry of emotions — love, betrayal, disgust, pity, and delight.” Click here to read the full story.

A sea of golden leaves, an old railroad bridge, the chatter of downtown, front porches … these possess “the reality of what Bloomington is,” writes C. D. Culper. In this second of our two feature stories on having a sense of belonging, Culper says everything Bloomington holds dear is held in “the B-Line’s pulse and patterns.” | Limestone Post

A Sense of Belonging — The B-Line Trail’s ‘Sounds of Bloomington Joy’

A sea of golden leaves, front porches, an old railroad bridge, the chatter of downtown … these possess “the reality of what Bloomington is,” writes C. D. Culper. In this second of our two feature stories on having a sense of belonging, Culper says everything Bloomington holds dear is held in “the B-Line’s pulse and patterns.” Click here to read the full story.

As we enter Thanksgiving holiday week — when “belonging” and feeling “at home” is such a part of the season — writer Amelia Brown describes Bloomington’s “warm feeling of familiarity” and why she belongs here. | ‘Bloomington, View over the rooftops #2,’ Mark W. Ratzlaff, 2016, oil on canvas on board

A Sense of Belonging — Bloomington’s ‘Warm Feeling of Familiarity’

As we enter the busiest travel season of the year — when “hometown” is such a part of the Thanksgiving holiday — we have a pair of stories (quite different from each other) about having a sense of belonging to a particular place. In this first one, writer Amelia Brown shows why she belongs in Bloomington. Click here to read the full story.

Writer and artist Sam Welsch Sveen takes us on a stroll to look at the exceptional artwork on display “in the atriums, hallways, classrooms, and offices” of the IU campus. Paintings, sculptures, and even the “atmospheric sounds, shimmering lights, and waves of tiny movements” of 'Amatria ,' pictured here, represent just some of the work in this collection of treasures. | Photo by Sam Welsch Sveen

IU Artwalk: The Accessible, Exceptional, and Alive

Writer and artist Samuel Welsch Sveen takes us on a stroll to look at the exceptional artwork on display “in the atriums, hallways, classrooms, and offices” of the IU campus. Paintings, sculptures, and even “atmospheric sounds, shimmering lights, and waves of tiny movements” represent just some of the work in this collection of treasures. Click here to read the full story.

Letting one political party define election districts has converted our representative government into a plutocracy, write Jim and Tomi Allison. The result of gerrymandering is legislators choosing their voters instead of voters choosing their legislators. Next week, several groups are convening in Bloomington to organize a rally later this month at the state capitol. | Public Domain

Statehouse Rally: ‘Let Voters Choose Their Legislators, Not the Other Way Around’

Letting one political party define election districts has converted our representative government into a plutocracy, write Jim and Tomi Allison. The result of gerrymandering is legislators choosing their voters instead of voters choosing their legislators. Next week, several groups are convening in Bloomington to organize a rally later this month at the state capitol. Click here to read the full story.

Ruthie Cohen keeps little food in her refrigerator, and yet she’s known to whip up three-course dinners without a trip to the store. How? She raids her pantry. Limestone Post’s resident sage shares her “Very Subjective, Idiosyncratic, Essential List” for a well-stocked pantry and freezer, as well as some of the dishes you can make with a quick trip to the market, such as her Cornbread in the Round. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

Stirring the Pot: Pantry Raid

Ruthie Cohen keeps little food in her refrigerator, and yet she’s known to whip up three-course dinners without a trip to the store. How? She raids her pantry. Limestone Post’s resident sage shares her “Very Subjective, Idiosyncratic, Essential List” for a well-stocked pantry and freezer. Click here to read the full story.

In 2016, a survivor of sexual assault had a physical evidentiary exam, known as getting a rape kit, at IU Health Bloomington Hospital. While she says this process itself was consistently clear and well explained, the process of tracking the whereabouts of her kit afterward was less-so. A new law seeks to improve this process, with a system that allows survivors to track the status of their rape kits themselves, rather than having to go though detectives. | Photo by Nicole McPheeters

New Law Will Help Survivors of Sexual Assault Track Rape Kits

Rape kits contain evidence collected during hospital exams of the survivors of sexual assault. Nearly half of the more than 5,000 untested rape kits collected in Indiana are considered “backlog,” but a new Indiana law could make tracking easier — especially for survivors. Writer Haley Miller and photographer Nicole McPheeters take a look at the process. Click here to read the full story.

Local farms that participate in Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs offer more than just fresh produce. Not only do they make us feel better about how our food is produced, they also create community and enforce a sense of purpose, writes Jared Posey. | Photo by Lynae Sowinski

Small Farms Are Putting the ‘Community’ in CSAs

Local farms that participate in Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs offer more than just fresh produce. Not only do they make us feel better about how our food is produced, they also create community and enforce a sense of purpose, writes Jared Posey. While CSAs give us far more than we pay for, are they at risk? Click here to read the full story.

Advertisement

  • Random Quote

    “They’re the people who go to karaoke, a group of friends who all vibe the same way…. They’re a special breed of people. We’re all kind of alike — misfit, weirdo kind of people. I’ve always identified with the misfit. Then it became the name of my business. I never thought it’d be the name of a community.” —Darran Mosley, entertainer, in "Big Mike’s B-town: Darran Mosley, Misfit" by Michael G. Glab
  • Advertisement

    Advertisement

    Advertisement

    Advertisement