While strides have been made toward income equity between men and women, Indiana ranks 49th in the country in gender wage gap. Amanda Stephens (pictured), a lawyer and Ph.D. candidate in gender studies, says, “We need to look at what is going on in our society that allows this pay gap to persist.” | Photo by Nicole McPheeters

Indiana has the 49th largest gender wage gap in the nation. And the cost of living in Monroe County compounds the problem. While strides have been made, at the current rate it will take decades to achieve equal pay. Writer Hayley Miller looks at the data and gets the perspectives of three local experts. Click here to read the story.

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  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to providing a space for informative, inclusive, and in-depth stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. Our local contributors cover the topics and issues that make this such an interesting place to live. All of our content is free, so browse our archives as much as you like! We’d love to hear your feedback.

    March 21, 2019

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A nonprofit called CDFI Friendly Bloomington offers financial support for underserved communities, including projects in the "creative sector." One possibility is to help fund public art in the Trades District, as shown in this rendering prepared for the City of Bloomington by Anderson + Bohlander, LLC. | Courtesy image

Banking rules and regulations often prevent underserved communities from getting financing for needed programs. Without investments, projects to assist in affordable housing, develop small businesses, create community facilities, and support the arts go unrealized. Writer Rachel Glago explains how an innovative financial model, a nonprofit called CDFI Friendly Bloomington, expands opportunities for low-wealth communities. Click here to read more.

In an ever-growing and -changing city, much of its heritage gets lost, along with the stories that go with it. While barns might have been common throughout what is now the Bloomington city limits, only a few such structures remain, such as this restored barn on what was once the property of the prominent Borland family on Bloomington’s southwest side. | Photo by Paul Bean

In an ever-growing and -changing city, much of its heritage gets lost, along with the stories that go with it. While barns might have been common throughout what is now the Bloomington city limits, only a few such structures remain. Writer Paul Bean found one such barn and the onetime prominent Bloomington family who built it. Click here to read more.

In the early 1800s, free Black pioneers settled in Orange County in what is now part of the Hoosier National Forest. The community thrived, despite a racist state constitution, hateful whites, and fugitive-slave catchers. As racial tensions increased, many of the families sold their land and left. Writer Diane Walker tracked down sources and documents to reveal what happened during this remarkable time in Indiana history. Pictured here, the East Fork of the White River near the Hoosier National Forest in Martin County. | Limestone Post

In the early 1800s, free Black pioneers settled in Orange County. The community thrived, despite a racist state constitution, hateful whites, and fugitive-slave catchers. As racial tensions increased, many of the families sold their land and left. Writer Diane Walker tracked down sources and documents to reveal what happened during this remarkable time in Indiana history. Click here to read the full story.

Front porches in Bloomington began to flourish in the early 1900s, when bungalows became the most common type of house being built. As writer Harriet Castrataro observes, front porches create a liminal space between two worlds — where the private and public come together. Bloomington’s front porches, both old and new, serve a multitude of purposes. Castrataro uses her front porch, pictured here with her cat Beppo, any time of year. | Photo by Harriet Castrataro

Bloomington’s Front Porches, a (Living) Space Between Two Worlds

Front porches in Bloomington began to flourish in the early 1900s, when bungalows became the most common type of house being built. As writer Harriet Castrataro observes, front porches create a liminal space between two worlds — where the private and public come together. Bloomington’s front porches, both old and new, serve a multitude of purposes. Click here to read the full story.

Protesters affiliated with the Indiana Forest Alliance work to protect 300 acres of the Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area in Brown County in 2017. Since 2012, the Indiana Division of Forestry has increased logging of state forests by 400 percent, says IFA's Anne Laker. | Photo courtesy of the Indiana Forest Alliance

Guest Column: Protecting Indiana Forests, the Bad News and the Good

Since 2012, the Indiana Division of Forestry has increased logging of state forests by 400 percent, says Anne Laker of the Indiana Forest Alliance. In this guest column, Laker talks about the dangers facing our publicly owned forests and an Indiana Senate bill that could protect them. She also previews the upcoming Wild & Scenic Film Festival in Bloomington. Click here to read the full story

Cicada Cinema, a small, community-driven and volunteer-run pop-up theater in Bloomington, hosts a variety of underrepresented films and related activities. Pictured here is a recent event at Hopscotch Coffee. Cicada Cinema will screen Amazon Studios’ ‘Beautiful Boy,’ a film about coping with addiction, followed by a discussion, at the FAR Center for Contemporary Arts on Tuesday, February 12. | Photo by Nicole McPheeters

Cicada Cinema To Show Amazon Studio Film ‘Beautiful Boy’

In collaboration with IU Cinema, IU Center for Rural Engagement, and the FAR Center of Contemporary Arts, Cicada Cinema is screening Amazon Studios’ Beautiful Boy, a film about coping with addiction. Amazon Studios has targeted theaters near areas with a high density of opioid overdoses and addiction for this partnership. Click here to read the full story.

Her grandson’s fascination with dump trucks has helped Ruthie Cohen to up her game in the kitchen. Now she considers “other methods and materials for cooking.” Led by “a little child with his toy bulldozer in hand,” she explores how a Japanese donabe, left, and a Tunisian tagine, right, can enrich your kitchen creations. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

Stirring the Pot: Dump Trucks and Donabes

Her grandson’s fascination with dump trucks has helped Ruthie Cohen to up her game in the kitchen. Now she considers “other methods and materials for cooking.” Led by “a little child with his toy bulldozer in hand,” she explores how a Japanese donabe and a Tunisian tagine can enrich your kitchen creations. Click here to read the full story.

After January’s polar vortex gives way to February’s cold, gray weather, it might seem like spring will never arrive. But don’t let cabin fever set in. LP’s Editorial Director Lynae Sowinski has compiled a list of expos, games, concerts, films, and other February activities all across our community that will “get you out of the house.” | Limestone Post

Cure Cabin Fever with a February Calendar Full of Events!

After January’s polar vortex gives way to February’s cold, gray weather, it might seem like spring will never arrive. But don’t let cabin fever set in. LP’s Editorial Director Lynae Sowinski has compiled a list of expos, games, concerts, films, and other February activities all across our community that will “get you out of the house.” Click here to read the full story.

For many, suppressing the feeling of hunger with restrictive diets only leads to more-intense levels of hunger, writes Amanda Boyer. Think “hangry.” But the practice of intuitive eating — eating in a way that honors and respects your body’s hunger and fullness as well as your cravings, such as for a scone (pictured here at Two Sticks Bakery) — could be a more healthful and pleasurable approach to food, without dieting. | Limestone Post

Suppress Dieting, Not Hunger, with Intuitive Eating

For many, suppressing the feeling of hunger with restrictive diets only leads to more-intense levels of hunger, writes Amanda Boyer. Think “hangry.” But the practice of intuitive eating — eating in a way that honors and respects your body’s hunger, fullness, and cravings — could be a more healthful and pleasurable approach to food, without dieting. Click here to read the full story.

Zaineb Istrabadi (center), pictured here in Bloomington in 1974 with her father, Rasoul (right), and cousins, calls herself “a Baghdadi. Hoosier” Writer Michael G. Glab calls her the apotheosis of a Midwesterner in his profile of the longtime senior lecturer in IU’s Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures. | Courtesy photo

Big Mike’s B-town: Zaineb Istrabadi, Baghdadi Hoosier

Zaineb Istrabadi calls herself “a Baghdadi Hoosier.” Writer Michael G. Glab calls her the apotheosis of a Midwesterner in his profile of the longtime senior lecturer in IU’s Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures. He also calls her “a woman of the world” and a member of one of Bloomington’s most storied families. Click here to read the full story.

Peregrine Falcons in America have soared back from the brink of extinction since the 1960s, even in Indiana. Just as humans caused their decline, “it was also dedicated humans who brought these birds back,” writes Jared Posey. This “standout conservation success story” is unusual because peregrines “may be benefiting from an increasingly urban landscape," such as Kinney, pictured here in Indianapolis. | Photo courtesy of Indiana Department of Natural Resources

Peregrine Falcons, a Conservation Success Story

Peregrine falcons in America have soared back from the brink of extinction since the 1960s, even in Indiana. Just as humans caused their decline, “it was also dedicated humans who brought these birds back,” writes Jared Posey. This “standout conservation success story” is unusual because peregrines “may be benefiting from an increasingly urban landscape.” Click here to read the full story.

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  • Random Quote

    “When I dance, I believe I am a messenger of the gods. I see dance as being used as communication between body and soul, to express what is too deep to find with words.” —Kim Morris Newson, longtime dancer and 15-year member of Indiana University’s African American Dance Company, in "Women Find ‘Freedom to Express’ Through Dance" by Allison Yates
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