Parenting through the pandemic can be challenging. But, as Jared Posey writes, self-care is important not only for a parent's well-being but also for teaching children how to respond to crises they will face in the future. Pictured above, the author mows the lawn while his son plays. | Photo by Katie Posey

Biohazard suits, protective masks, sheltering at home, and other grim realities of COVID-19 have raised fears and questions among children. Providing answers can be difficult for parents. But, as Jared Posey writes, self-care is important not only for a parent’s well-being but also for teaching children how to respond to future crises.
Click here for a guide to parenting through a pandemic.

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    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    May 24, 2020

  • Community Notice

Community Notice

Thinking about planting a garden? Beth Edwards, a writer and producer for the Indiana Environmental Reporter, has written about the physical, mental health, economic, and environmental benefits of home gardening. People with no space for a garden can rent a plot through the community garden program run by in the City of Bloomington’s Department of Parks and Recreation (see the end of the article for more info). Pictured above, the Willie Streeter Community Gardens on South Highland Avenue. | Limestone Post

Home gardens not only create access to healthy food, they also offer physical, mental health, economic, and environmental benefits, writes Beth Edwards of the Indiana Environmental Reporter. No wonder home gardening has gained in popularity every year since the 2008 financial crisis. Sheltering at home has even more Hoosiers digging in. Click here to learn more.

Abby Ang at the People’s Market CSA drive-thru on March 28. Ang and a group of vendors, community organizers, and university professors began meeting last year to plan what would become the People’s Market, “a farmers market model unprecedented in Bloomington and Indiana,” writes Ellen Wu for Limestone Post. The group had to “reorient swiftly to the drive-thru CSA once it became obvious that COVID-19 would upend everything.” | Limestone Post

A group of vendors, community organizers, and university professors began meeting last year to plan what would become the People’s Market, “a farmers market model unprecedented in Bloomington and Indiana,” writes IU history professor Ellen Wu. When COVID-19 “upended everything,” the group quickly reoriented to create a drive-thru CSA. Click here to read about the People’s Market.

This screenshot of the Indiana COVID-19 Data Report shows the number of COVID-19 cases statewide and by county of residence as of April 2. It is updated daily on the Indiana State Department of Health website. To mitigate the damage being done to the economy, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act offers financial help for nonprofits, independent contractors, and cooperatives.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act that was recently passed by Congress offers programs and initiatives to offer economic relief caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The program called Economic Injury Disaster Loans & Emergency Economic Injury Grants offers help specifically for nonprofits, cooperatives, and independent contractors. Click here to learn more about the program.

A lone bike rider on the nearly empty streets of Bloomington, Indiana, March 25, 2020. Local officials, organizations, and individuals have developed programs and resources to help people trying to cope during the COVID-19 crisis. | Limestone Post

List of COVID-19 Resources for Bloomington and Monroe County

Bloomington and Monroe County officials, organizations, and individuals have responded to the COVID-19 crisis by developing programs and resources to help people trying to cope in the pandemic. Limestone Post has compiled this list for people who need help, who want to help, or who just want more information. Click here for the list.

United Way of Monroe County issued a press release announcing that nearly 30 local organizations are launching an emergency relief fund to support "human service organizations in Monroe, Owen, and Greene counties" during the COVID-19 outbreak. According to the press release, grants will be distributed to groups "best positioned to meet the emerging needs resulting from this crisis." | Courtesy image

Press Release: Local Groups Launch COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund

United Way of Monroe County issued a press release announcing that nearly 30 local organizations are launching an emergency relief fund to support “human service organizations in Monroe, Owen, and Greene counties” during the COVID-19 outbreak. According to the press release, grants will be distributed to groups “best positioned to meet the emerging needs resulting from this crisis.” Click here to read the full press release.

Limestone Post food columnist Ruthie Cohen says her lifelong love affair with dairy, eggs, meat, poultry, and fish has come to an end. But the breakup is not heartbreaking. Rather, she's now in a healthier relationship with a little more spice — and grains, beans, legumes, fruits, and vegetables — a diet harnessing plant power. | Photo by Ruthie Cohen

Stirring the Pot: Ruthie’s Plant Power Recipes

For too many reasons to ignore, LP food columnist Ruthie Cohen says her lifelong love affair with dairy, eggs, meat, poultry, and fish has come to an end. But the breakup is not heartbreaking. Rather, she’s now in a healthier relationship with a little more spice — and grains, beans, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Click here for four of Ruthie’s recipes that harness plant power.

Writer Michael G. Glab says team nicknames and mascots adopted by Indiana’s high schools tell the stories of this 'high school hoops mad' Hoosier state. This 1905 photo shows the Peru High School girls team. Peru would later adopt the nickname the Tigers, as their town was the winter home to many circuses. | Photo courtesy of

Hoosier High School Mascots Tell the Stories of Our State

As Indiana high schools enter basketball tourney season, writer Michael G. Glab looks at some of the unusual and interesting nicknames and mascots teams have had over the years, as told in the book Hoosiers All by Emerson Houck. From Aces to Zebras, Glab writes, these nicknames tell the stories of this “high school hoops mad” Hoosier state. Click here to read the article.

A project by the Monroe County Plan Commission is designed to turn a 100-acre former quarry property northwest of Bloomington into a limestone heritage park that would highlight the history of the local limestone industry and the art of stonecutting, as well as provide an arts venue open to the public. | Photo by Geoff McKim

Monroe County Commission Plans Limestone Quarry Heritage Park

Writer Laurie D. Borman reports on a project by the Monroe County Plan Commission to turn a 100-acre former quarry property into a limestone heritage park that would highlight the history of the local limestone industry and the art of stonecutting, as well as provide an arts venue open to the public. (Posted: No Swimming.) Click here to read the full story.

Discussions about the controversy at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market have dismissed the voices of Bloomington’s people of color, says historian Ellen Wu. “This is a major omission, considering that African American, Latinx, and Asian American women have made integral interventions into the debate.” Wu interviewed eight of these women to hear what they say is at stake and what solutions can ensure the safety and well-being of everyone at the market.

Bloomington 2019: ‘The Year of the Farmers’ Market Controversy’

Media coverage and discussions about the Bloomington Farmers’ Market have dismissed the voices of Bloomington’s people of color, says historian Ellen Wu. “This is a major omission, considering that African American, Latinx, and Asian American women have made integral interventions into the debate.” For this article, Wu interviewed eight women of color to get their perspectives on the controversy.
Click here to read the article.

Photographer M.J. Bower photographed more than 30 murals in Bloomington to create a Bloomington Mural Trail. This mural, ‘Love This City,’ was painted by Eva Allen on the side of Mother Bear’s Pizza’s east-side location in spring 2019. The full list of murals is at the end of the article, as is a link to The Bloomington Trail Map. | Photo by M.J. Bower

The Murals of Bloomington — Photos and Trail Map

Murals provide “a splash of color” in downtown Bloomington during the winter when most natural color has gone dormant, writes M.J. Bower. She photographed more than 30 local murals for this photo essay on an art form that has existed since prehistoric cave paintings. She also created a Bloomington Mural Trail for some outdoor winter fun. Click here to see the Murals of Bloomington and Trail Map.

Limestone Post Magazine has just become a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. With the need for reliable local news being more important than ever, we are committed to publishing articles that help our readers to make informed decisions about our community. Edited photo of the Monroe County Courthouse in early morning. | Limestone Post

As a New Nonprofit, Limestone Post Will Focus on Community Journalism

We are proud to announce that Limestone Post Magazine has become a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization! With the need for reliable local news being more important than ever, we are committed to publishing articles that help our readers to make informed decisions about our community. Click here to read what this means for Limestone Post and community journalism.

Community Notice

  • Random Quote

    “What we’ve realized is that this is the most interesting, unique experiment — unconscious experiment — because from the very beginning, we really wanted it to come from your heart, give what you can. And then, have common sense and courtesy.” —Sara Steffey McQueen, founding member of May Creek Farm, in "Intentional Communities Must ‘Bend with the Times’" by John Mikulenka
  • Community Notice

    Community Notice

    Community Notice

    Community Notice