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Peregrine Falcons, a Conservation Success Story

Peregrine falcons in America have soared back from the brink of extinction since the 1960s, even in Indiana. Just as humans caused their decline, “it was also dedicated humans who brought these birds back,” writes Jared Posey. This “standout conservation success story” is unusual because peregrines “may be benefiting from an increasingly urban landscape.” Click here to read the full story.

Overcoming Stigma and Suspicion To Trust Antiretroviral Therapy

If early treatment with antiretroviral therapy reduces the risk of transmitting HIV by 96 percent through medicine that prevents the growth of HIV, then why are some people reluctant to try it? Writer Haley Miller and photographer Nicole McPheeters continue their inquiry into how people live with the threat or diagnosis of HIV. Click here to read the full story.

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Holiday Roundup: Our Top Stories of 2018

Limestone Post Editorial Director Lynae Sowinski presents her annual roundup of our top stories of 2018 — once again showing the wide-ranging interests of our readers. As you enjoy some of the best local writing and photography of 2018, we at Limestone Post and all of our contributors wish you a very happy 2019! As always, thank you for reading! Click here to read the full story.

Alternatives to the Criminal Justice System: Mediation, Restorative Justice

Resolving conflicts between offenders and victims with restorative rather than punitive measures allows the offender to repair the damage and the victim to heal. Writer Ann Georgescu explores restorative justice, mediation, and other methods used by the nonprofit Community Justice and Mediation Center as alternative approaches to the criminal justice system. Click here to read the full story.

City Needs ‘Push’ From Public To Improve Bike Infrastructure

“Bloomington is at a crossroads — culturally, civically, and economically,” says writer Sean Starowitz, assistant director of the arts for the City of Bloomington. Touching on all of these is our bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. While many people say they want a friendlier biking and walking town, “the car dominates its urban fabric and infrastructure.” Click here to read the full story.

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15 Audio Tours By ASE Students Share Their ‘Sense of Place’

For the third straight year, students in Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at the Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship have explored a specific place that has special meaning to them — from their own backyard to Griffy Lake to high above the city. In 15 immersive audio tours, they each share their unique sense of place. Click here to watch their videos!

Big Mike’s B-town: Vauhxx Booker, ‘Fortune Favors the Bold’

“Everything inside me — starting with my name, Vauhxx — spoke to me and said I had to speak up,” says Vauhxx Booker, spokesperson for Bloomington’s Black Lives Matter. He also spoke with writer Michael G. Glab about his family’s deep-rooted American history, his shy childhood, and his potential plans for public office in Bloomington. Click here to read the full story.

A Sense of Belonging — The B-Line Trail’s ‘Sounds of Bloomington Joy’

A sea of golden leaves, front porches, an old railroad bridge, the chatter of downtown … these possess “the reality of what Bloomington is,” writes C. D. Culper. In this second of our two feature stories on having a sense of belonging, Culper says everything Bloomington holds dear is held in “the B-Line’s pulse and patterns.” Click here to read the full story.

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A Sense of Belonging — Bloomington’s ‘Warm Feeling of Familiarity’

As we enter the busiest travel season of the year — when “hometown” is such a part of the Thanksgiving holiday — we have a pair of stories (quite different from each other) about having a sense of belonging to a particular place. In this first one, writer Amelia Brown shows why she belongs in Bloomington. Click here to read the full story.

IU Artwalk: The Accessible, Exceptional, and Alive

Writer and artist Samuel Welsch Sveen takes us on a stroll to look at the exceptional artwork on display “in the atriums, hallways, classrooms, and offices” of the IU campus. Paintings, sculptures, and even “atmospheric sounds, shimmering lights, and waves of tiny movements” represent just some of the work in this collection of treasures. Click here to read the full story.

Statehouse Rally: ‘Let Voters Choose Their Legislators, Not the Other Way Around’

Letting one political party define election districts has converted our representative government into a plutocracy, write Jim and Tomi Allison. The result of gerrymandering is legislators choosing their voters instead of voters choosing their legislators. Next week, several groups are convening in Bloomington to organize a rally later this month at the state capitol. Click here to read the full story.

New Law Will Help Survivors of Sexual Assault Track Rape Kits

Rape kits contain evidence collected during hospital exams of the survivors of sexual assault. Nearly half of the more than 5,000 untested rape kits collected in Indiana are considered “backlog,” but a new Indiana law could make tracking easier — especially for survivors. Writer Haley Miller and photographer Nicole McPheeters take a look at the process. Click here to read the full story.