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Beyond Bloomington 89 results

Fire@Nite, Sculpture Trails Iron Pour, ‘Lights Up the Night Sky’

This July in Greene County, Sculpture Trails Outdoor Museum marks 10 years of “giving back” their passion for metalwork. The museum conducts monthlong workshops for students and working artists, with many events open to the public, capped by the Fire@Nite Iron Pour, which “lights up the night sky,” says writer Laurie D. Borman. Click here to read what's happening at Sculpture Trails.

Bloomington Firefighters Train with Sierra Leone Fire Force

In February, the Bloomington Fire Department sent five firefighters to Sierra Leone to train with the Sierra Leone Fire Force. The trip was coordinated by BFD Chief Jason Moore and Sierra Leonean Eastina Taylor, who participated last summer in the IU Mandela Washington Fellowship. Taylor wrote about the experience for LP. Click here for the full story.

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Student Review: Yodeling Group Adilei at Childs Elementary ‘An Eye Opener’

In April, Adilei, a yodeling-based a cappella group from the Republic of Georgia, performed at Childs Elementary School as part of the Lotus Blossoms educational outreach program presented by the Lotus Education & Arts Foundation. Childs fifth-grader Stella, 11, reviewed the performance for Limestone Post, calling it "an eye opener.” Click here for Stella’s review and a brief video of Adilei.

Hoosier Lawyers, Voters Owe Debt to Antoinette Leach

Since Antoinette Leach began her career as Indiana’s first female lawyer 126 years ago, “the power and presence of women lawyers have increased exponentially, mostly in the past 30 years,” writes Diane Walker, who adds that “both women lawyers and women voters — and, one could argue, all Americans — owe a debt to Antoinette Leach.” Click here to see why.

Lick Creek Settlement Holds Piece of Black History in Indiana

In the early 1800s, free Black pioneers settled in Orange County. The community thrived, despite a racist state constitution, hateful whites, and fugitive-slave catchers. As racial tensions increased, many of the families sold their land and left. Writer Diane Walker tracked down sources and documents to reveal what happened during this remarkable time in Indiana history. Click here to read the full story.

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Guest Column: Protecting Indiana Forests, the Bad News and the Good

Since 2012, the Indiana Division of Forestry has increased logging of state forests by 400 percent, says Anne Laker of the Indiana Forest Alliance. In this guest column, Laker talks about the dangers facing our publicly owned forests and an Indiana Senate bill that could protect them. She also previews the upcoming Wild & Scenic Film Festival in Bloomington. Click here to read the full story

Big Mike’s B-town: Zaineb Istrabadi, Baghdadi Hoosier

Zaineb Istrabadi calls herself “a Baghdadi Hoosier.” Writer Michael G. Glab calls her the apotheosis of a Midwesterner in his profile of the longtime senior lecturer in IU’s Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures. He also calls her “a woman of the world” and a member of one of Bloomington’s most storied families. Click here to read the full story.

Peregrine Falcons, a Conservation Success Story

Peregrine falcons in America have soared back from the brink of extinction since the 1960s, even in Indiana. Just as humans caused their decline, “it was also dedicated humans who brought these birds back,” writes Jared Posey. This “standout conservation success story” is unusual because peregrines “may be benefiting from an increasingly urban landscape.” Click here to read the full story.

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Guest Column: ‘The Antidote to Healthcare Despair Is Activism’

The premise of our healthcare system without the Affordable Care Act? If you can’t afford healthcare, you don’t deserve it, writes Rob Stone, a local physician, healthcare activist, and one of the founders of Hoosiers for a Commonsense Health Plan. Stone and others are fighting to protect Hoosiers from this “medical caste system.” Click here to read the full story.

IU Mandela Washington Fellow Takes ‘New Ideas’ from Indiana Home to Sierra Leone

Eastina Marian Boimadi Taylor was so inspired by her visit to Indiana this past summer that she is using some of the ideas created here to inspire others in her home in Freetown, Sierra Leone. She says, "All I see now is possibilities." This is the second of two Q&A articles featuring young leaders in the Mandela Washington Fellowship at Indiana University. Click here to read the full story.

Tuskegee Airmen at 1940s Hoosier Airfield Played Role in Military Desegregation

In 1948, President Truman signed an executive order that desegregated the U.S. military. While protests against segregation had occurred for years across the country, a nonviolent act of disobedience by 100 African American officers at an Army base in Seymour, Indiana, reportedly contributed to Truman’s decision. This protest, writer Paul Bean says, is often mischaracterized as an "uprising" or "mutiny." Click here to read the full story.

Guest Column: Lotus Artists Follow Hearts, Challenge Social Injustices

With all the world music being performed this week at Lotus, at least two acts have powerful messages for our own country. Raye Zaragoza’s music often conveys political, social, or environmental messages folded into song, while Making Movies portrays the struggles of immigrants, writes Sara Sheikh, marketing director of the Lotus Education & Arts Foundation. Click here to read the full story.