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History 26 results

Hoosier Lawyers, Voters Owe Debt to Antoinette Leach

Since Antoinette Leach began her career as Indiana’s first female lawyer 126 years ago, “the power and presence of women lawyers have increased exponentially, mostly in the past 30 years,” writes Diane Walker, who adds that “both women lawyers and women voters — and, one could argue, all Americans — owe a debt to Antoinette Leach.” Click here to see why.

The Borland Barn: Preserved Relic of a Bygone Time

In an ever-growing and -changing city, much of its heritage gets lost, along with the stories that go with it. While barns might have been common throughout what is now the Bloomington city limits, only a few such structures remain. Writer Paul Bean found one such barn and the onetime prominent Bloomington family who built it. Click here to read more.

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Lick Creek Settlement Holds Piece of Black History in Indiana

In the early 1800s, free Black pioneers settled in Orange County. The community thrived, despite a racist state constitution, hateful whites, and fugitive-slave catchers. As racial tensions increased, many of the families sold their land and left. Writer Diane Walker tracked down sources and documents to reveal what happened during this remarkable time in Indiana history. Click here to read the full story.

Tuskegee Airmen at 1940s Hoosier Airfield Played Role in Military Desegregation

In 1948, President Truman signed an executive order that desegregated the U.S. military. While protests against segregation had occurred for years across the country, a nonviolent act of disobedience by 100 African American officers at an Army base in Seymour, Indiana, reportedly contributed to Truman’s decision. This protest, writer Paul Bean says, is often mischaracterized as an "uprising" or "mutiny." Click here to read the full story.

Edwin Fulwider’s Early-1900s Boyhood in Bloomington, ‘A Memoir’

More than thirty years ago, artist Edwin Fulwider wrote a memoir about growing up in Bloomington in the early 1900s. The memoir portrays a “rich landscape of local art, life, and history” of a bygone era, writes Michelle Gottschlich. Fulwider’s perspective is especially insightful because he grew up in several different neighborhoods. Click here to read the full story.

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‘Crime Spotlight’ Writer Does Justice to True Crime Stories

True crime writer Sarah Kolodziej has been hooked on stories of crime, murder, and suicide since she was five years old. While a case anywhere might grab her eye, most of the ones she writes about on her "Crime Spotlight" blog and Instagram account have ties to Bloomington and Indiana — especially cold cases and unsolved crimes. Writer Jonah Chester investigates. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Hoagy Bix Carmichael

While Hoagy Bix Carmichael was in town for IU Theatre’s production of Stardust Road: A Hoagy Carmichael Musical Journey, he talked with writer Michael G. Glab about growing up in Hollywood, his famous namesakes (Hoagy and Bix), and the musical that is premiering in Bloomington. They even squeezed in some talk about fly-fishing. Click here to read the full story.

Local Photographer’s Career Spans the Globe in Stories and Photos

Writer Claude Cookman sits down with photographer Steve Raymer to discuss Raymer's new book, Somewhere West of Lonely: My Life in Pictures. Cookman says Raymer shows how photojournalism is “the essential eyes for citizens in democratic societies to understand an increasingly complex world.” Raymer, an IU emeritus professor, was a veteran National Geographic photographer in the “golden age” of magazine photojournalism. Click here to read the full story and see many of Raymer's photos.

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8 Fun and Weird Hoosier Places to Explore This Summer

From nightmares to utopias, from the classic to the kitschy, Indiana has many unique and unconventional places to explore. If you’re uninspired by the same old vacation spots, take a day trip or weekend excursion to these unusual places — all less than a three-hour drive from Bloomington. Writer Allison Yates leads the way. Read the full story here.

Columbus’s Miller House a Crown Jewel of Architecture and Design

While Columbus’s architectural treasures have been admired for decades, it wasn’t until 2011 that the Miller House and Garden, designed by architect Eero Saarinen, opened for public tours. Writer Jenny Elig and photographer Adam Reynolds take us to the family home of J. Irwin and Xenia Miller — and inside the architectural jewel. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Derek Richey, House Hugger

A family project of photographing Bloomington’s history became a mission for Derek Richey to preserve its past. Now he works with a fervor to preserve the houses that give our community so much character, because “that’s why people want to live in Bloomington,” he says in this profile by Michael G. Glab. Click here to read the full story.

Local Conservancy Now Saving Indigenous Languages Worldwide

Since 2005, Bloomington-based nonprofit The Language Conservancy has helped save indigenous languages across the nation. And now, a partnership with the United Nations expands TLC’s efforts worldwide. As writer Michelle Gottschlich’s article says, in addition to revitalizing endangered languages, TLC’s work is about getting people back “to being a human being.” Click here to read the full story.