Community Notice

History 31 results

Peaceful Protesters Outraged at Racist Attacks and Anti-Black Violence

On two consecutive days in downtown Bloomington, protestors expressed outrage at the racial aggression, profiling, and anti-Black violence that residents have faced — recently, historically, and continually — in the community. Each protest was attended by hundreds of supporters, culminating in a march through the streets. Click here to learn more.

Photos: ‘Enough Is Enough’ March and Protest in Bloomington

On June 5, Bloomington’s largest protest in decades was held in response to nationwide police brutality and systemic racism toward Black people. “Enough Is Enough” was a peaceful march and protest in which organizers emphasized that, while the event on Friday was encouraging, more needs to be done in the fight for racial justice. Click here for the photo gallery.

Community Notice

Hoosier High School Mascots Tell the Stories of Our State

As Indiana high schools enter basketball tourney season, writer Michael G. Glab looks at some of the unusual and interesting nicknames and mascots teams have had over the years, as told in the book Hoosiers All by Emerson Houck. From Aces to Zebras, Glab writes, these nicknames tell the stories of this “high school hoops mad” Hoosier state. Click here to read the article.

Monroe County Commission Plans Limestone Quarry Heritage Park

Writer Laurie D. Borman reports on a project by the Monroe County Plan Commission to turn a 100-acre former quarry property into a limestone heritage park that would highlight the history of the local limestone industry and the art of stonecutting, as well as provide an arts venue open to the public. (Posted: No Swimming.) Click here to read the full story.

Truth Matters Event To Raise Awareness About Disinformation in the News

Fake news masquerading as journalism? Truth Matters, an event at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater on October 19, features two films and a panel of media experts that will help people detect disinformation in the news and on social media platforms. (Limestone Post is one of 14 sponsors of this event.) Click here to learn more about Truth Matters.

Community Notice

Hoosier Lawyers, Voters Owe Debt to Antoinette Leach

Since Antoinette Leach began her career as Indiana’s first female lawyer 126 years ago, “the power and presence of women lawyers have increased exponentially, mostly in the past 30 years,” writes Diane Walker, who adds that “both women lawyers and women voters — and, one could argue, all Americans — owe a debt to Antoinette Leach.” Click here to see why.

The Borland Barn: Preserved Relic of a Bygone Time

In an ever-growing and -changing city, much of its heritage gets lost, along with the stories that go with it. While barns might have been common throughout what is now the Bloomington city limits, only a few such structures remain. Writer Paul Bean found one such barn and the onetime prominent Bloomington family who built it. Click here to read more.

Lick Creek Settlement Holds Piece of Black History in Indiana

In the early 1800s, free Black pioneers settled in Orange County. The community thrived, despite a racist state constitution, hateful whites, and fugitive-slave catchers. As racial tensions increased, many of the families sold their land and left. Writer Diane Walker tracked down sources and documents to reveal what happened during this remarkable time in Indiana history. Click here to read the full story.

Community Notice

Tuskegee Airmen at 1940s Hoosier Airfield Played Role in Military Desegregation

In 1948, President Truman signed an executive order that desegregated the U.S. military. While protests against segregation had occurred for years across the country, a nonviolent act of disobedience by 100 African American officers at an Army base in Seymour, Indiana, reportedly contributed to Truman’s decision. This protest, writer Paul Bean says, is often mischaracterized as an "uprising" or "mutiny." Click here to read the full story.

Edwin Fulwider’s Early-1900s Boyhood in Bloomington, ‘A Memoir’

More than thirty years ago, artist Edwin Fulwider wrote a memoir about growing up in Bloomington in the early 1900s. The memoir portrays a “rich landscape of local art, life, and history” of a bygone era, writes Michelle Gottschlich. Fulwider’s perspective is especially insightful because he grew up in several different neighborhoods. Click here to read the full story.

‘Crime Spotlight’ Writer Does Justice to True Crime Stories

True crime writer Sarah Kolodziej has been hooked on stories of crime, murder, and suicide since she was five years old. While a case anywhere might grab her eye, most of the ones she writes about on her "Crime Spotlight" blog and Instagram account have ties to Bloomington and Indiana — especially cold cases and unsolved crimes. Writer Jonah Chester investigates. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Hoagy Bix Carmichael

While Hoagy Bix Carmichael was in town for IU Theatre’s production of Stardust Road: A Hoagy Carmichael Musical Journey, he talked with writer Michael G. Glab about growing up in Hollywood, his famous namesakes (Hoagy and Bix), and the musical that is premiering in Bloomington. They even squeezed in some talk about fly-fishing. Click here to read the full story.