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Indiana Department of Natural Resources 10 results

Peregrine Falcons, a Conservation Success Story

Peregrine falcons in America have soared back from the brink of extinction since the 1960s, even in Indiana. Just as humans caused their decline, “it was also dedicated humans who brought these birds back,” writes Jared Posey. This “standout conservation success story” is unusual because peregrines “may be benefiting from an increasingly urban landscape.” Click here to read the full story.

Invasive Plants Are Still For Sale in Indiana, How You Can Help

They’re a centuries-old assault on our environment, but eradicating invasive plants requires more than pulling them out by the roots — especially since big box stores still sell them and red tape in the governor’s office still allows those sales. Writer Susan M. Brackney explains this weedy predicament, and how people can help. Click here to read the full story.

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Resistance to the DNR’s Logging of Yellowwood

Several diverse groups have mobilized in recent months to oppose logging in Yellowwood State Forest. The resistance comes to a head this week, as forest advocates, including hundreds of scientists, are asking Gov. Eric Holcomb to call off the plan to cut down trees in Yellowwood’s backcountry and old-growth forest areas. Click here for the full story and how to get involved.

A Hike on the Tecumseh Trail Now Ends in Destruction

Matt Flaherty has traveled the Tecumseh Trail by hiking and camping on it with friends in late summer, running the marathon course in October, and running all 42 miles on one winter’s day. The last trip, though, ended when they reached the southern trailhead and found it had been destroyed by logging trucks. Click here to read the full story.

For Some, Winter Means Outdoor Adventures

Wintertime gives outdoor enthusiasts an experience that fair-weather campers often only pretend to enjoy — seclusion in the great outdoors. In frigid and even subfreezing temperatures, when most people are staying warm inside, campers usually have the forests to themselves. And with the right equipment and preparation, winter camping can offer the best of the outdoors. Click here to read the full story.

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Outfitted: Paddling the Lakes and Rivers of Southern Indiana

Adventure-travel writer, outfitter, and explorer of the unknown, Michael Waterford says some of the best excursions can be had in southern Indiana. In this introduction to paddling, he offers suggestions on how to get on local lakes and rivers. It’s the first step, he says, to saving them. Click here to read the full story.

150 Species in Indiana Now Listed As Endangered or ‘Special Concern’

What would happen if the hellbender goes? More than 150 mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and mollusks that call Indiana home are now listed as “endangered” or “special concern” in the state. Susan M. Brackney shows who decides which animals make the cut — and how. Click here to read the full story.

Treasure Hunting at Goose Pond During Marsh Madness

The spring migration of sandhill cranes and countless other birds will be celebrated on March 4-5 during the 7th Annual Marsh Madness Sandhill Crane Festival at Goose Pond Fish and Wildlife Area. David Rupp, owner of IndiGo Birding Nature Tours, gave Limestone Post a preview on a recent trip to the pond. Click here to read the full story.

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From the B-Line Trail to the Pacific Ocean — Hiking the American Discovery Trail

Imagine hiking from the B-Line Trail to the Pacific Ocean (or the Atlantic) without ever leaving an official hiking trail. For years, hiking enthusiasts have been working on the American Discovery Trail, a coast-to-coast trail that passes through southern Indiana. Connecting it to the B-Line, via the Knobstone Trail, isn’t far-fetched. Click here to read the full story.

Diggers, Dealers, and Appalachian Outlaws: Unearthing Indiana’s Ginseng Trade

Susan M. Brackney explores the often misunderstood world of hunting wild ginseng and how ethical stewardship among the diggers and careful monitoring by conservation officers have kept Indiana’s ginseng population relatively healthy — despite the portrayal of supposed ginseng diggers on reality TV making it look adventurous and lucrative. Click here to read the full story.