Partner/Sponsor

Indiana University 94 results

What Happens When an Opioid Epidemic Collides with the COVID Pandemic?

For more than two decades, the opioid epidemic has raged on in small rural towns and in the suburbs. But what happens when the opioid epidemic collides with the COVID pandemic? Rebecca Hill writes about these “waves” of crises in Bloomington and other southern Indiana communities, and how people are weathering it. Click here to read the story.

Keeping Track of Migrating Birds, the ‘Sentinels’ of Our Ecosystem

In 1803, James Audubon tracked birds by tying thread around their legs. Researchers around the world now use technology such as satellite telemetry to understand how migration affects these “sentinels” of our ecosystem. With a reported 30 percent of bird species lost since the 1970s, writes Rebecca Hill, the information gathered is more important than ever. Click here to read the article.

Partner/Sponsor

Stirring the Pot: Valeria Dreams of Paprika

Ruthie Cohen stirs the pot this month with paprika-rich Hungarian bean soup, courtesy of Valeria Varga, senior lecturer in IU’s Hungarian Studies program. Hungary is known for its paprika, and Valeria makes cooking demonstrations an essential part of her summer courses. “There is nothing like the aroma and the color of paprika,” Valeria says. Click here for Ruthie's story and Valeria's recipe!

‘100% American’ Hate Groups, Christian Nationalism, and the Indiana KKK

While the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana peaked nearly 100 years ago, its members’ support of Christian nationalism is reflected in various political, militia, and hate groups today. Writer Laurie D. Borman interviewed several experts who suggest the ideologies espoused by today’s far-right groups are a continuation of the country's racist past. Click here to read the article.

Invisible Neighbors: How To Include People Left Out of B-town’s Neighborhoods

In the past 25 years, housing supply in Bloomington has not kept pace with population growth, and prices have gone up while wages have remained flat. Housing expert Deborah Myerson says exclusionary housing policy creates issues related to housing affordability, accessibility, racial inequity, and climate change — as well as invisible neighbors in our community. Click here to read Deborah’s article.

Partner/Sponsor

Overcoming Barriers to Mental Health Services in a Pandemic

Economic distress, loss, and isolation due to the pandemic have increased the need for mental health services in Monroe County. While local providers have reinvented how they offer such services, many people still confront barriers to accessing them. Eszi Waters spoke to people at several agencies to see how they have adapted. Click here to read the article.

Limestone Post’s Top Stories of 2020, a Most Unusual Year

As we look forward to 2021, it might serve us well to remember how our community responded with remarkable resilience and resolve to the challenges we faced — and continue to face — in this exceptionally challenging year. Limestone Post’s talented and dependable contributors kept us informed on many of the important topics of the time. Click here to read about LP’s Top Stories of 2020.

Guest Column: ‘IU 2020’ Series Filmed 12 Students for 4 Years

“IU 2020” is a documentary series that began in 2016 and follows 12 Indiana University students during the entirety of their undergraduate careers. Jennifer Piurek, director of communications and special projects at IU’s Office of the Provost, wrote about the students and the project — and the free screening on December 8. Click here to learn about “IU 2020.”

Partner/Sponsor

‘Amphibious’ Park in Clarksville Anticipates Climate Change Impact

Water volume in the Ohio River is expected to increase by 30 percent over the next 50 years. But a 600-acre park being developed in southern Indiana will turn the inevitable flooding into an attraction, making it “the first climate-resilient park in the Midwest.” Click here to read the story by Beth Edwards of the Indiana Environmental Reporter.

Theater Residency at The Hundredth Hill Creates Art During Pandemic

Krista Detor and Dave Weber’s artist retreat, The Hundredth Hill, has served since August as a theater residency for a troupe of recent graduates from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Not only has the group created two productions but they will also perform them for live audiences — an all but unheard-of feat in theater during the pandemic. Click here for the story.

Book Excerpt: ‘Minister’s Daughter: One Life, Many Lives’ by Charlotte Zietlow

Before becoming a local political powerhouse in Bloomington, Charlotte Zietlow and her husband, Paul, spent a year in Czechoslovakia as part of an educational exchange program. She says in her new memoir, “Minister’s Daughter: One Life, Many Lives,” with Michael G. Glab, that the experience proved American democracy was worth fighting for. Click here to read an excerpt from the book.

Galleries Adapt to Pandemic While Artists Continue to Create [Photo Essay]

Art galleries are adapting to ever-changing conditions during the pandemic. Photographer Paige Strobel visited several local galleries to find out how they are welcoming visitors — in-person, online, or both. “While the world looks different and extra precautions are in place,” she writes, “one can still experience the incredible artists and artistry this town offers.” Click here for Paige’s story and photos.