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Indiana University 67 results

IU Artwalk: The Accessible, Exceptional, and Alive

Writer and artist Samuel Welsch Sveen takes us on a stroll to look at the exceptional artwork on display “in the atriums, hallways, classrooms, and offices” of the IU campus. Paintings, sculptures, and even “atmospheric sounds, shimmering lights, and waves of tiny movements” represent just some of the work in this collection of treasures. Click here to read the full story.

What Do Babies Know? IU Scientists Say ‘More Than You Think’

Researchers of infant development at IU say we — and artificial intelligence — can learn a lot from babies. And some have teamed up with the staff at WonderLab to create exhibits and activities tailor-made for young patrons, writes Jennifer Richler. While genes explain some of the differences in the rate at which kids develop, the environment does too — and that’s where places like WonderLab can help. Click here to read the full story.

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IU Mandela Washington Fellow Shares Impressions and Photos of Bloomington

Francis Shok Mweze spent six weeks this summer in IU’s Mandela Washington Fellowship. Now back in Bukavu, Democratic Republic of the Congo, he hopes to make his hometown a “visual arts capital in the region.” Limestone Post asked Mweze about his ambitions, his stay in Bloomington, and about the photos he took while here. Click here to read our Q&A with Mweze and to see some of his photos of Bloomington.

Big Mike’s B-town: Cristian Medina, Scientist, Poet, Chess Leader

Cristian Medina, a poet, cook, IU researcher, and chess leader from Arica, Chile, has found plenty to keep him busy since moving to Bloomington in the mid-2000s. LP columnist Michael G. Glab talks to Medina about his hometown — bordered by ocean, mountains, and desert — geology and climate change, his work founding Cardboard House Press, and more in the latest Big-Mike’s B-town. Click here to read the full story.

Cave Diving in Southern Indiana Takes a Mature Mindset

Samuel Frushour and his cave-diving peers have mapped miles of aquatic caves in southern Indiana. While Hoosier caverns might not have the clear blue waters of tropical caves, they offer an adventure that is increasingly difficult to find in modern times — exploring uncharted territory. Writer Jonah Chester dives into the story. Read the entire story here.

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Local Photographer’s Career Spans the Globe in Stories and Photos

Writer Claude Cookman sits down with photographer Steve Raymer to discuss Raymer's new book, Somewhere West of Lonely: My Life in Pictures. Cookman says Raymer shows how photojournalism is “the essential eyes for citizens in democratic societies to understand an increasingly complex world.” Raymer, an IU emeritus professor, was a veteran National Geographic photographer in the “golden age” of magazine photojournalism. Click here to read the full story and see many of Raymer's photos.

Reconcile the ‘Happy’ and ‘Pathetic’ Moments of Parenting with Play

“All the love and irritability” of parenting can be hard to reconcile. But experts are finding one of the best ways to cope is through play. More importantly, says writer Jared Posey, play is crucial to childhood development — of motor coordination, emotional intelligence, creative thinking, problem-solving, and relationship building, among others. Click here to read the full story.

Guest Column: IU’s Solar Strategy ‘Shortsighted’

Single city blocks all over Bloomington generate more rooftop solar energy than the entirety of Indiana University’s Bloomington campus, says writer Matt Flaherty in this guest column. What’s most troubling, he says, is that IU’s “dollars-and-cents analysis of solar power is the fundamentally wrong approach for IU to take.” Click here to read the full story.

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850 Hoosier Scientists and Allies Oppose EPA Proposal

Concerned Scientists @ IU, a group of 850 local scientists and allies, has submitted a public comment to oppose the EPA’s proposed repeal of the Clean Power Plan. The EPA’s case for repeal, the scientists say, is based on “unconvincing legal arguments, without appropriate consideration of the scientific evidence for human-induced climate change.” Read their comment, as well as the proposed repeal, here.

Visiting Photographer Engaging Local Groups in Project ‘Juvenile in Justice’

Photographer and activist Richard Ross will be in Bloomington for a two-day interdisciplinary arts program, showing his work on juvenile justice and discussing how artists can create “in a time of rage,” among other events. One of his former assistants, Rachel Glago, writes about his work and how a dozen local groups are getting involved. Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: ‘Nice Nails,’ A Play That Cuts to the Quick

Social issues are rarely black and white, as revealed in Nice Nails, a play by Aaron Ricciardi, presented by IU’s theatre department. LP columnist Jennifer Pacenza looks Behind the Curtain at the circumstances in which a Korean family, a South African immigrant, and a trans man are entangled in labor-law violations in Long Island nail salons. Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: Maya and Hoosiers Share Culture Through Opera

Mary Grogan, creator and director of ÓperaMaya, is introducing Bloomington to the Maya culture — and introducing opera to the Maya in Mexico. ÓperaMaya tours, festival-like, all over the Yucatan Peninsula, where few have experienced the art form. Writer Jennifer Pacenza talks to Grogan about what this means for Bloomington and the Maya. Click here to read the full story.