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Indiana University 75 results

Cave Diving in Southern Indiana Takes a Mature Mindset

Samuel Frushour and his cave-diving peers have mapped miles of aquatic caves in southern Indiana. While Hoosier caverns might not have the clear blue waters of tropical caves, they offer an adventure that is increasingly difficult to find in modern times — exploring uncharted territory. Writer Jonah Chester dives into the story. Read the entire story here.

Local Photographer’s Career Spans the Globe in Stories and Photos

Writer Claude Cookman sits down with photographer Steve Raymer to discuss Raymer's new book, Somewhere West of Lonely: My Life in Pictures. Cookman says Raymer shows how photojournalism is “the essential eyes for citizens in democratic societies to understand an increasingly complex world.” Raymer, an IU emeritus professor, was a veteran National Geographic photographer in the “golden age” of magazine photojournalism. Click here to read the full story and see many of Raymer's photos.

Reconcile the ‘Happy’ and ‘Pathetic’ Moments of Parenting with Play

“All the love and irritability” of parenting can be hard to reconcile. But experts are finding one of the best ways to cope is through play. More importantly, says writer Jared Posey, play is crucial to childhood development — of motor coordination, emotional intelligence, creative thinking, problem-solving, and relationship building, among others. Click here to read the full story.

Guest Column: IU’s Solar Strategy ‘Shortsighted’

Single city blocks all over Bloomington generate more rooftop solar energy than the entirety of Indiana University’s Bloomington campus, says writer Matt Flaherty in this guest column. What’s most troubling, he says, is that IU’s “dollars-and-cents analysis of solar power is the fundamentally wrong approach for IU to take.” Click here to read the full story.

850 Hoosier Scientists and Allies Oppose EPA Proposal

Concerned Scientists @ IU, a group of 850 local scientists and allies, has submitted a public comment to oppose the EPA’s proposed repeal of the Clean Power Plan. The EPA’s case for repeal, the scientists say, is based on “unconvincing legal arguments, without appropriate consideration of the scientific evidence for human-induced climate change.” Read their comment, as well as the proposed repeal, here.

Visiting Photographer Engaging Local Groups in Project ‘Juvenile in Justice’

Photographer and activist Richard Ross will be in Bloomington for a two-day interdisciplinary arts program, showing his work on juvenile justice and discussing how artists can create “in a time of rage,” among other events. One of his former assistants, Rachel Glago, writes about his work and how a dozen local groups are getting involved. Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: ‘Nice Nails,’ A Play That Cuts to the Quick

Social issues are rarely black and white, as revealed in Nice Nails, a play by Aaron Ricciardi, presented by IU’s theatre department. LP columnist Jennifer Pacenza looks Behind the Curtain at the circumstances in which a Korean family, a South African immigrant, and a trans man are entangled in labor-law violations in Long Island nail salons. Click here to read the full story.

Behind the Curtain: Maya and Hoosiers Share Culture Through Opera

Mary Grogan, creator and director of ÓperaMaya, is introducing Bloomington to the Maya culture — and introducing opera to the Maya in Mexico. ÓperaMaya tours, festival-like, all over the Yucatan Peninsula, where few have experienced the art form. Writer Jennifer Pacenza talks to Grogan about what this means for Bloomington and the Maya. Click here to read the full story.

Science for Grown-ups: Indulge in the Study of Chocolate at WonderLab After Dark by Harper Humphrey, WonderLab Museum

WonderLab After Dark: Chocolate! On February 17th, WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology is open late for a 21-and-over event featuring local libations, food, and, of course, chocolate. Visitors can also explore the science and history of this coveted treat, as well as WonderLab’s other hands-on exhibits. In preparation for the big night, WonderLab Museum Educator Jared Katz has been busy researching the origins of cacao. Click here to read more about WonderLab After Dark: Chocolate.

Big Mike’s B-town: Wounded Galaxies, Where 1968 Intersects with 2018

Wounded Galaxies 1968 — a conference, festival, and symposium including art exhibits, film screenings, and music performances — intersects with Bloomington’s orbit next month. LP columnist Michael G. Glab spoke to Joan Hawkins, a founder of the group that’s organizing the event. While Wounded Galaxies looks at the tumultuous year 1968, Hawkins says the event will be more than a museum piece: “We want to confront the whole concept of revolutionary aesthetics, and ask, ‘Where do we go from here?’” Click here to read the full story.

PRIDE — and Its Film Fest — More Inclusive Than Ever

As the 16th annual PRIDE Film Festival runs this weekend, PRIDE, the local organization that represents the LGBTQ+ community, is “focused more on helping people on the margins,” says Board Chair Janae Cummings. “We don’t want to leave anyone behind.” Writer Erin Hollinden reports on PRIDE’s “recalibrated” vision — and about the Festival. Click here to read the full story.

Teens Explore Their ‘Sense of Place’ in Video Project

Students at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship have completed a class project that challenged them to choose a location and reflect on what it means to them. Then they each made a video to express that location’s “sense of place.” They’ve shared their work with Limestone Post, and the results are powerful. Click here to watch and learn.