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Indiana University 75 results

Local Book Lovers Share Their Current Reads

People read books for many reasons, and a highly literate community like ours has voracious readers. Writer Allison Yates spoke to just nine local literati, and she discovered people are reading books that help them to reflect inwardly, learn about (or escape!) the outside world, stay informed, and investigate the past. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Abegunde, Writing to Heal

Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde has been given many names, each one representative of her own history, her family’s history, and her Yoruba cultural heritage. And, like her names, Abegunde’s work represents the personal and the historical. LP columnist Michael G. Glab talks with the poet and scholar about her work with healing and social justice. Click here to read the full story.

Logging, Runoff in 5 Counties Threaten Health of Lake Monroe

The Lake Monroe watershed — the land and creeks that drain into the lake — includes parts of five counties. Writer Susan M. Brackney looks at a group of “friends” who are safeguarding the lake — along with our drinking water and the plants, fish, and wildlife of Lake Monroe — from the effects of runoff and logging. Click here to read the full story.

‘Read Local’: A Letter from the Desk of Emily Winters, LP’s Marketing and Advertising Director

Limestone Post Marketing and Advertising Director Emily Winters toots her horn about why she loves LP (and you should, too)! A woman with a mission, Emily helps LP’s in-depth, informative stories find their way to loyal readers and the broader community. “The need for homegrown stories and independent voices is ever-pressing," she writes. "LP publishes stories that not only showcase Bloomington’s creativity and quirkiness, but they also examine issues and pose questions that help make us a more informed and engaged community." Click here to read more.

The Cycle of Life in Osamu James Nakagawa’s Photography

Throughout his career, Indiana University artist-educator Osamu James Nakagawa has captured profound life changes in his photography. As an exhibition of Nakagawa’s work opens October 13 at IU’s Grunwald Gallery, IU Professor Emeritus Claude Cookman observes how Nakagawa’s striking imagery reflects “death and life, grief and joy, past and future.” Click here to read the full story.

Joel Pett: Humanist with a ‘Mean Streak a Mile Wide’ Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Joel Pett served up an adult portion of art and stand-up at his homecoming

Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and Bloomington expat Joel Pett returned to his hometown recently for a gallery show — and a stand-up gig. After talking to Pett about his work, writer Yaël Ksander wonders whether a man with “a mean streak a mile wide” has, deep down, a passion for humanity. Click here to read the full story.

Ross Lockridge Jr., a Great American Tragedy

In 1948, Ross Lockridge Jr. died by suicide in Bloomington just months after his best-selling novel, Raintree County, was published. In 2014, Doug Storm interviewed two of Lockridge’s sons for Interchange, his show on WFHB. Here, Storm writes about the sons’ conflicting opinions on the suicide and the assessment of Raintree County as the Great American Novel. Click here to read the full story.

IU Researcher: Some Species Adapt Faster to Climate Change

IU Research Scientist Adam Fudickar studies animal behavior in response to climate change. “Many parts of the planet that haven’t changed for a really long time are changing very rapidly,” he says. While many species cannot adapt fast enough, some can, which provides hope to researchers. Writer Brian Hartz explores Fudickar’s work on the dark-eyed junco. Click here to read the full story.

‘Stone Country,’ the Land That Carved a People

In her first article for Limestone Post, Yaël Ksander, a producer at WFIU, takes an in-depth look at the collaboration between photographer Jeffrey Wolin and writer Scott Russell Sanders, whose two books (published 30 years apart) are a chronicle of our quarries — the workers, rock, and cultural histories of the Indiana limestone industry. Click here to read the full story.

New Art Scene Is Redefining What ‘Gallery’ Means

What do you think of when you hear “Bloomington art gallery”? Many traditional galleries might come to mind, but a new scene is emerging that offers “hip alternatives to the institutions,” says Lindsay Welsch Sveen. With photos by Samuel Welsch Sveen, she shows us several places that are redefining “gallery.” Click here to read the full story.

Eclipse 2017! Where It Lands Near Bloomington

On August 21, the moon will totally eclipse the sun, sending umbral shade across America from west to east. Around Bloomington, people will witness a 94 percent eclipse, but LP writer and editor Dason Anderson shows many places and ways to experience this rare event — either the partial or total eclipse — not far from here. Click here to read the full story.

With Invasives, an Ounce of Prevention Is Worth a Pound of Cure

A healthy environment requires native plants that interact with insects, birds, and wildlife. When invasive plants are introduced, they can quickly crowd out native species and wreak havoc on an ecosystem. Annie Corrigan, announcer and producer at WFIU Public Radio, wrote about invasive plants for her weekly radio show, Earth Eats. Click here to read the full story.