Community Notice

Recipe 13 results

Stirring the Pot: Acquired Tastes, The Mighty Mustard Seed

In this edition of Stirring the Pot, writer Ruthie Cohen experiences a bit of Dijon vu. While her mother always kept a tin of dry mustard in the cupboard, Ruthie didn’t acquire a taste for the “nasty condiment” until years later. Now it’s a part of her well-stocked kitchen. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Shaking Up the Repertoire

Ruthie Cohen says planning a menu can be like reaching for a favorite pair of jeans. Resorting to reliable recipes can make us forget dishes that are “too basic or too fussy or too old-fashioned.” But also delicious. Our Stirring the Pot columnist suggests shaking up the repertoire by resurrecting old faves. Click here to read the full story.

Community Notice

Stirring the Pot: ‘Baking Is an Art That People Consume’

In her latest column, Stirring the Pot, Ruthie Cohen savors the confection of cinnamon rolls from home baker Elizabeth Bauder. With patience and care, these warm, gooey treats are surprisingly easy to make. Baking is a creative outlet, Elizabeth says. “It’s a way to love people.” Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Ayurveda, a Holistic Feast

LP columnist Ruthie Cohen stirs up Ayurveda-inspired recipes from health educator Kristin Londergan. A 5,000-year-old holistic physical and spiritual practice, Ayurveda is meant to bring balance into one’s life. Ruthie says the food is “a feast for the eyes, a boon for your gut, a balm for your spirit.” Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Guiltless and Often Tastier Shortcuts

Sometimes, taking a shortcut will reveal something new and wonderful; sometimes it just gets the job done faster. In the kitchen, as Ruthie Cohen has discovered several times, something as simple as a jar of salsa could be your eureka moment. Click here to read the full story.

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Stirring the Pot: At Thanksgiving, Let ‘the Absurdities’ Creep In

Ruthie Cohen shares her wisdom about what’s most important at Thanksgiving dinner. People often get distracted by the bird, the side dishes, or the presentation. In this edition of Stirring the Pot, she advises not to suppress “the absurdities and silliness that creep in” — and enjoy not knowing how it will all turn out. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Granola, Where More Is Often Less — How Lifelike

Ruthie Cohen has learned that you don’t mess with certain things in life. Her chicken soup, for instance. Or her mother’s meatball recipe. But, usually, as with Ruthie's granola, the recipe changes: Ingredients are added and deleted until, ultimately, the dish is stripped to its delicious essence. How lifelike. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: A Bowl of (Dried) Cherries

Being a friend is a privilege, says Ruthie Cohen. With some friends, talking about cooking and cherries can lead to talk of restaurants, yoga poses, children, grandchildren, and former husbands. For her, friendship is a hallowed institution — a lifeline in stormy seas and a place where we can be our best selves. Click here to read the full story.

Community Notice

Stirring the Pot: Swamped!

A dish doesn’t have to look pretty, or even sound pretty, to be delicious. And Ruthie Cohen’s souplike, stewlike “Swamp” is more than either of those. It’s her own version of Proust’s madeleine, a tasty delight that brings back fond memories of the time a smart-aleck teenager gave the dish its name. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: A Trio of Treats

Ruthie Cohen says volunteering at Habitat for Humanity is both humbling and empowering. But her biggest contribution isn’t hanging doors or framing sheds — although she has learned such skills (more or less). Rather, the skill she brings to the worksite has helped her find a home among her fellow volunteers. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: A Journey to the 7 Minute Thanksgiving Meal

After realizing her Thanksgiving dinners were not so Norman Rockwellian, Ruthie Cohen shed the expectation of “how things ought to be” and embraced the way things are. Preparing for Thanksgiving dinner has now become an ongoing celebration — and her utilitarian Stuffing Loaf, a means to an end. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Apples to Apples

Ruthie Cohen reflects on how rituals season our lives, such as the apple-picking pilgrimages she and her children used to take every fall. Although her children have “launched” (that is, left the nest), she continues to peel, core, and prepare, adding her own touches to a coveted recipe and remembering the smiling eyes of her apple-cheeked children. Click here to read the full story.