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Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market 5 results

Guest Column: Changing Minds on Climate Change Is Possible

Since the 2016 election, few people concerned about climate change thought they could have meaningful discussions with climate-science deniers. But members of Citizens' Climate Lobby (CCL) believe their efforts have even encouraged some congressional Republicans to consider a solution to the issue. In this guest column, writer and CCL activist Erin Hollinden explains how. Click here to read the full story.

Stirring the Pot: Spring — Such Bounty, Such Joy

Spring brings such a fresh bounty of veggies and greens, the recipes are bound only by your mood and temperament, says Ruthie Cohen. “In food, in fashion, in life, we are always making choices, assembling, reassembling, collecting, discarding.” Making the everyday unique, making the timeless your own, she says, creates loveliness in the world. Click here to read the full story.

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Can Permaculture Make Society Sustainable? Part 1

Permaculture, says writer Daniel Bingham, originated as an attempt to reshape industrial agriculture into sustainable ecological design that works in harmony with the natural world. First applied to farmsteads, it’s also used to create self-reliant homesteads. Part philosophy, part methodology, and part science, permaculture integrates humans with the natural environment. Click here to read the full story.

Book by Local Poet Ross Gay Selected as Finalist for the National Book Award

The National Book Foundation just announced the Finalists for the National Book Award. Among them is Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, a collection of poems by Indiana University professor Ross Gay. In this profile by Brian Hartz, Gay reflects on his work, on the powerful influence Bloomington has had on his poetry, and what this national recognition means to him. Click here to read the full story.

Farm to Yarn: The Wool Part 1 of a 3-Part Series on the Life of Local Fiber

Knitting and other fiber crafts have found a new generation of enthusiasts who care about the source of their yarn as much as about its color and pattern. In this first installment of a 3-part series, Lindsay Welsch traces yarn to one of its local sources, Marble Hill Farm. Click here to read the full story.

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